Peconic bay – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ Mon, 16 May 2022 23:13:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://robins-island.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T005401.436.png Peconic bay – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ 32 32 White House reaches deal to restart formula production as LI’s parents struggle https://robins-island.org/white-house-reaches-deal-to-restart-formula-production-as-lis-parents-struggle/ Mon, 16 May 2022 23:13:56 +0000 https://robins-island.org/white-house-reaches-deal-to-restart-formula-production-as-lis-parents-struggle/ The White House announced an agreement with Abbott, the nation’s largest infant formula maker, to reopen the nation’s largest infant formula manufacturing plant – a key step toward easing a nationwide shortage. national level even as efforts were launched locally to deal with the growing crisis. As the nationwide shortage reached emergency levels for many […]]]>

The White House announced an agreement with Abbott, the nation’s largest infant formula maker, to reopen the nation’s largest infant formula manufacturing plant – a key step toward easing a nationwide shortage. national level even as efforts were launched locally to deal with the growing crisis.

As the nationwide shortage reached emergency levels for many families, Suffolk County lawmakers joined one of the region’s largest food banks for a major formula drive.

The local dynamic is carried by Legis. Dominick Thorne (R-Patchogue) and Island Harvest Food Bank, who will distribute the formula to families in need. All 18 county lawmakers will place Island Harvest collection boxes in their district offices this week, officials said.

“We want to make sure every child is fed and no one goes to bed hungry,” Thorne said at a Patchogue news conference on Monday.

Abbott confirmed on Monday that it had agreed to restart production, under a consent degree, a binding legal agreement, with the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA investigated safety issues at the Sturgis, Michigan facility.

After production resumes, Abbott said it will take at least eight weeks to begin shipping new products to stores.

Brian Deese, director of the White House National Economic Council, said the FDA would also take action on Monday to allow more foreign imports of formulas into the United States to address urgent supply constraints.

The shortage is linked to a voluntary recall in February by Abbott that closed the company’s Michigan plant, exacerbating ongoing supply chain disruptions among formula makers.

The recall was triggered by reported illnesses in four babies who had consumed formula from the plant. All four infants were hospitalized with a rare type of bacterial infection and two died.

Abbott emphasized that its products were not directly linked to bacterial infections.

Across the country and across the region, consumers have reported a limited or non-existent supply of formula in grocery stores and pharmacies, with many large retailers placing strict limits on the number of bottles and containers that can be purchased during each visit. .

“These are very stressful times for parents in need,” said Randi Shubin Dresner, president and chief executive of Island Harvest in Suffolk, noting that some children with rare metabolic diseases need formula products. very specialized. “Parents and caregivers just need to feed their babies. It’s something we’ve all taken for granted for decades. When we needed formula, you just had to go to the store and get it. These days, that’s just not the case.”

Dawn Melchiona, director of infant/toddler services at Long Island Head Start, which supports 270 at-risk low-income children, said it’s getting harder and harder to get formula to infants in their six daycares and two family daycares.

“Sellers don’t have enough formula to fill our orders,” she said.

Over the weekend, the White House — which has come under intense pressure to do more to ease the formula shortage — offered formula makers and retailers transportation and logistics support to boost production, in particular by contacting their suppliers to encourage them to prioritize the production and delivery of the ingredients of the formula.

Several area lawmakers, including Reps. Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley) and Tom Suozzi (D-Glen Cove), who are each running for governor, have urged Biden to invoke the Defense Production Act of 1950 to increase the supply of infant formula.

And House lawmakers are expected to vote this week on bills that would loosen restrictions on the type of formula that can be purchased with women, infants and children. [WIC] benefits and another allocating federal funds to purchase infant formula in Chile, Mexico, Ireland and the Netherlands.

Despite federal and local efforts, Dresner said it could take several months before the shortage is corrected and formula supplies return to normal.

“It becomes a rolling issue,” she said. “Once you start with a shortage, catching up takes a long time.”

In the meantime, healthcare professionals on Monday warned Long Island parents against diluting their formula because babies can’t handle the water load, which could lead to kidney disease, growth problems, development of vision and lungs and neological disorders.

“I know many parents are struggling and at a loss as to what to do to feed their babies, but not watering down formula is critical,” said Dr. Patricia Mele, Director of Perinatal-Neonatal Services at Peconic Bay. Medical Center.

Mele also cautioned parents against attempting to make their own formula or buying formula from overseas factories that aren’t FDA-approved.

Dr. Adrian Cohen, Clinical Director of the OB-GYN Service Line for Northwell Health’s 10 Maternities, encouraged new mothers, whenever possible, to breastfeed their babies, especially right after birth.

“Breast milk is made for every baby,” Cohen said. “It’s more medicine than food.”

With AP

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Advisor BJ Ianfolla on mooring procedures https://robins-island.org/advisor-bj-ianfolla-on-mooring-procedures/ Sat, 14 May 2022 15:39:40 +0000 https://robins-island.org/advisor-bj-ianfolla-on-mooring-procedures/ Councilor BJ Ianfolla. (file photo of the journalist) Councilor BJ Ianfolla challenged City Council’s May 3 business session with an op-ed in the Reporter discussing proposed changes to the process for handling mooring applications by the Waterways Management Advisory Council (WMAC). The editorial called on the city council to move on to other matters, noting […]]]>

Councilor BJ Ianfolla challenged City Council’s May 3 business session with an op-ed in the Reporter discussing proposed changes to the process for handling mooring applications by the Waterways Management Advisory Council (WMAC).

The editorial called on the city council to move on to other matters, noting that the process in place had worked well for years.

“There is always room for improvement,” Ms. Ianfolla told her colleagues.

This is not a reflection on the members of WMAC who have done “a phenomenal job”, she said. But she wants the bay constables, who are in charge of law enforcement, to be involved in the process of approving applications.

She also suggested that there should be a fresh look at the conservation moorings that were rejected by WMAC in 2018. The Peconic Estuary Partnership had encouraged the use of conservation moorings.

But WMAC members were concerned that over time the mooring lines would work their way out of the bottom. Ms Ianfolla said conservation moorings may have improved in recent years and more information should be sought.

Proponents have urged the use of conservation moorings in areas where there is eelgrass, which needs to be protected. These seagrass beds feed endangered species, including sea turtles.

Mooring construction materials may have changed since 2018, Councilman Jim Colligan said.

There are also questions about whether commercial moorings should be reduced to allow more mooring space for residents.

WMAC members claim they can accommodate most requests for mooring spaces, with minor modifications for safety reasons. But occasionally there is a wait in certain areas, although an alternate area is usually offered.

Over the years, it hasn’t been necessary to reduce commercial moorings to accommodate the moorings sought by residents, according to WMAC. Another concern has been the need to bring younger members into WMAC.

The current members are able to do the job, but they are generally in the same age group, and if several were to retire at the same time, it would be important to have younger members with the experience to do the job. work,” said Colligan.

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A new tool to help solve the housing crisis in the city https://robins-island.org/a-new-tool-to-help-solve-the-housing-crisis-in-the-city/ Thu, 12 May 2022 16:07:24 +0000 https://robins-island.org/a-new-tool-to-help-solve-the-housing-crisis-in-the-city/ A 0.5% real estate transfer tax, if approved by voters, would allow East Hampton Town to provide greater housing opportunities to eligible residents. Residents of the Manor House condominiums, the first ownership opportunity in the city’s affordable housing efforts, took possession last year. If voters approve a 0.5% real estate transfer tax in a referendum […]]]>

A 0.5% real estate transfer tax, if approved by voters, would allow East Hampton Town to provide greater housing opportunities to eligible residents. Residents of the Manor House condominiums, the first ownership opportunity in the city’s affordable housing efforts, took possession last year.

If voters approve a 0.5% real estate transfer tax in a referendum on the November ballot, East Hampton Town will have what Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc called Tuesday “perhaps the most powerful tool important” to address the shortage of affordable housing.

The Peconic Bay Area Community Housing Act, co-sponsored by Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. and State Senator Anthony Palumbo and signed by Governor Kathy Hochul last year, authorizes five East End towns to create community housing funds financed by the 0.5% tax, which would be in addition to the 2% transfer tax that subsidizes the community preservation fund.

Money from the community housing fund could be used to help first-time home buyers who live or work for the city with financial assistance in the form of a grant or loan. It could also be used to acquire real estate for housing offered for sale or rental; create housing for sale or rent; rehabilitate existing structures to convert them into housing; providing financial support for housing through a public-private partnership for employer-supported housing and housing counselling.

The legislation increases the full transfer tax exemption from $250,000 to $400,000 for properties developed in East Hampton, Southampton and Shelter Island, and from $150,000 to $200,000 for properties developed in Southold and Riverhead.

The exemption only applies to transfers of $2 million or less. First-time buyers would be exempt from paying transfer duties.

In order to act upon the authority conferred by the Peconic Bay Area Community Housing Act, each city must first develop its own enabling legislation. On Tuesday, Jennifer Nigro, the city’s assistant attorney, briefed the city council on a proposed law.

The state law language was added to the city code regarding the existing Community Housing Opportunity Fund, she told the council. “Our bill essentially mirrors that law.”

This fund “was decades ahead of this legislation in preparation for this day,” Van Scoyoc said. “So we’re really ahead of the game.” Money from the existing Community Housing Opportunity Fund would flow into the new Community Housing Fund, he said.

The enabling legislation would create a Community Housing Advisory Council that would review and make recommendations regarding the Community Housing Opportunity Fund. Van Scoyoc likened that advice to the city’s Water Quality Technical Advisory Committee, a group that makes recommendations about which sanitation projects are worth funding with a portion of the CPF. The council would consist of between seven and 15 town residents who would serve without compensation. It would include one representative each from the construction, real estate and banking sectors, and three representatives from local housing advocacy or social service organizations.

The plan will be discussed further next week, Mr Van Scoyoc said, and the council would like the enabling legislation to be finalized and passed by next month “so that people are clear about what is going on before the referendum”.

“It’s important for people to understand that it will work much like the CPF functions,” the supervisor said, “in terms of the money received [that] will be held in a housing fund to be administered by the finance department. The fund will be audited annually, he said, to ensure that all expenditures are in accordance with the law.

“I think this is perhaps the most important tool the city will have to deal with the housing crisis,” he said. It is “now up to us to pick up the slack and cross the finish line so that we can have a meaningful impact on solving this crisis.”

A public hearing on the bill will take place next month.

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🌱 Southampton Daily: 100 Mile Walk for Medical Debt + $PSEG Bonus https://robins-island.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-southampton-daily-100-mile-walk-for-medical-debt-pseg-bonus/ Sun, 08 May 2022 14:59:41 +0000 https://robins-island.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-southampton-daily-100-mile-walk-for-medical-debt-pseg-bonus/ Happy Monday neighbours! Diane Witek here with everything you need to know in town today. First, today’s weather forecast: Rather cloudy and windy. High: 56, low: 47. Here are today’s top stories in Southampton: Alexa Suess found herself with a medical debt of more than $250,000 at the age of 20. .To learn more or […]]]>

Happy Monday neighbours! Diane Witek here with everything you need to know in town today.


First, today’s weather forecast:

Rather cloudy and windy. High: 56, low: 47.


Here are today’s top stories in Southampton:

  1. Alexa Suess found herself with a medical debt of more than $250,000 at the age of 20. .To learn more or donate, visit www.miles4medicaldebt.com.(Suffolk Time)
  2. A new LIPA report said: “PSEG Long Island is eligible to receive $9.4 million in bonuses for 2021 after hitting 24 of 26 service goals for the year, despite low customer satisfaction scores that left it near the bottom in a national ranking.” (Subscription: press day)
  3. The Peconic Bay Medical Center has grown! PBMC added another operating room, making it the seventh, and purchased a new da Vinci XI robotic surgical system to help expand minimally invasive surgical procedures. The da Vinci Surgical System not only translates the surgeon’s hand movements in real time, it allows doctors to access high definition 3D views of the surgical area magnified 10 times the human eye! (RiverheadLOCAL)

Today in Southampton:

  • FAST program – Fun activities with snacks and time for homework! (4 p.m.)
  • Juvenile Court – City of Southampton Youth Office. (6 p.m.)
  • Battle of the Brains with Bob DeStefano. (6 p.m.)
  • Annual budget hearing of the board of directors. (6:30 p.m.)
  • Regular Meeting of the Board of Trustees – Tuckahoe Common School District. (7 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation:😻 Meet Flora! She’s staying snuggled up on this rainy day. Come meet her and give her some love! https://southamptonanimalshelter.com/adopt-cats/.” (Facebook) (Website)
  • Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation: 🚨 “Found dog found in Calverton on Edwards Avenue. Safe at SASF. Please call 631-728-7387 for information.” (Facebook) (Website)
  • Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse: “LICADD 2022 Tee Off for Teens Golf Invitational at Maidstone Golf Club! LAST CHANCE! Please consider showcasing your organization and supporting the mission by purchasing a hole, golf ball or caddy bib sponsorship!” (Facebook) (Website)

More from our sponsors – please support the local news!

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For sale:

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You are now in the loop and ready to start this Monday. I’ll be back in your inbox tomorrow morning with a new update!

Diane Witek

About me: Passionate writer, Website designer, Social Media Marketer and newly proclaimed Baker. Lover of nature and animals of all kinds.

Got a news tip or suggestion for an upcoming Southampton Daily? Contact me at diane.witek@patch.com

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Buvard: Three DWI arrests in four days, Disturbance reported on Cross Sound Ferry https://robins-island.org/buvard-three-dwi-arrests-in-four-days-disturbance-reported-on-cross-sound-ferry/ Sat, 07 May 2022 10:01:51 +0000 https://robins-island.org/buvard-three-dwi-arrests-in-four-days-disturbance-reported-on-cross-sound-ferry/ Southold Town Police Headquarters in Peconic. (Credit: Grant Parpan) Southold Town Police have arrested a motorcyclist for driving while intoxicated following an accident in Cutchogue on Saturday evening. Cutchogue resident David Truglia, 36, was heading north on Stillwater Avenue when he took his hands off the handlebars, lost control and crashed around 6:30 p.m., according […]]]>

Southold Town Police have arrested a motorcyclist for driving while intoxicated following an accident in Cutchogue on Saturday evening.

Cutchogue resident David Truglia, 36, was heading north on Stillwater Avenue when he took his hands off the handlebars, lost control and crashed around 6:30 p.m., according to a report. Police said Mr Truglia was airlifted to Stony Brook University Hospital, treated and released. He was charged with DWI, officials said.

• A 24-year-old Brentwood man was arrested for DWI following a single-car crash in Cutchogue early Sunday morning.

Edwin Claros was driving westbound on Highway 25 when he veered off the road and crashed into a tree and a water main around 4:20 a.m.

A police news release did not say whether Mr Claros was injured, but officials said he was arrested for impaired driving at the scene.

• Police arrested a 28-year-old Greenport man for DWI after receiving a report of an erratic driver last Thursday night.

Police say Maycon Rosales-Gonzalez was pulled over for traffic violations along Route 48 around 9:30 p.m. when he was discovered intoxicated.

• A 39-year-old man from Woonsocket, RI, was banned from the Cross Sound Ferry last Thursday after shouting and threatening crew members because bar service was taking too long, according to police reports. Three police officers and a sergeant responded to the Orient ferry terminal, where the man signed a trespassing notice and agreed to leave without further incident.

• Detectives have been made aware of a possible break-in at a vacant home along Peconic Bay Boulevard in Laurel last week.

The owner, a 64-year-old Flandrienne, told police she found an empty bag of crisps and a towel on the floor of the unoccupied house, which is currently up for sale. She told police she suspected “children probably broke in to hang out”, between April 21 and last Monday when the incident was reported.

• Police responded to a party at a house along Main Road in Laurel after receiving a complaint about fireworks on Saturday night.

The owner, a 41-year-old man, admitted to setting off fireworks and agreed to arrest, according to a police report.

• A 36-year-old man from Mattituck called police last Monday to report that an unknown person had smashed the rear window of his vehicle along Depot Lane in Cutchogue.

Police noted in a report that there were no signs that the incident was criminal in nature.

• The East Marion Fire Department extinguished a small mulch fire in Lavender by the Bay along Route 25 last Monday around 7 p.m.

No foul play is suspected, officials said.

• Police were called to a bus stop along Main Road in Laurel on Friday morning after receiving a report of an intoxicated man lying on the side of the road.

An officer arrived and found a 29-year-old man, Laurel, who did not appear to be intoxicated but said he was waiting for the S-92 bus to take him to work.

The officer transported the man to his job in Cutchogue, according to reports.

• An unknown person used the personal information of a 65-year-old Southold woman to file a claim for unemployment assistance with the Arkansas Department of Commerce last week. The woman responded to police headquarters to file a report last Thursday afternoon and was asked to place a fraud alert on her credit.

Those named in the police reports have not been convicted of any crime or offense. The charges against them can then be reduced or withdrawn, or they can be declared innocent.

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Safely Dispose of Household Hazardous Waste, Unwanted Medicines Saturday on ‘STOP’ Day https://robins-island.org/safely-dispose-of-household-hazardous-waste-unwanted-medicines-saturday-on-stop-day/ Wed, 04 May 2022 21:09:13 +0000 https://robins-island.org/safely-dispose-of-household-hazardous-waste-unwanted-medicines-saturday-on-stop-day/ Riverhead Town’s Stop Throwing Pollutant Day will be held in conjunction with a Medication Take Back Event on Saturday, May 7 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Riverhead Road Service Yard located at 1177 Osborn Avenue in Riverhead. Residents of Riverhead can safely dispose of electronics, household chemicals, automotive products and more. For […]]]>

Riverhead Town’s Stop Throwing Pollutant Day will be held in conjunction with a Medication Take Back Event on Saturday, May 7 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Riverhead Road Service Yard located at 1177 Osborn Avenue in Riverhead.

Residents of Riverhead can safely dispose of electronics, household chemicals, automotive products and more. For a full list of items that can be eliminated during the event, Click here. For more information on STOP Day, call (631) 727-3200 ext. 391.

The drug take-back event is organized by the Riverhead Community Coalition for Safe and Drug-Free Youth. The Riverhead Police Department will be on hand to safely dispose of your medications. All medications are accepted as long as they are properly sealed.

Peconic Bay Medical Center/Northwell Health will also be on hand at the 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. event to provide training and free naloxone (Narcan) kits to community members who are interested. Naloxone (Narcan) is an antidote to an opioid overdose. It is a life-saving drug that can be administered by anyone. The training lasts 2-3 minutes and you will receive a free Naloxone (Narcan) kit.

The Riverhead Community Coalition for Safe and Drug-Free Youth will also provide free Deterra Drug Deactivation Kits to community members. Deterra kits allow community members to safely dispose of unused, unwanted, or expired medications at home.

For more information on the medication take-back event, call (631) 727-3722 ext. 106.

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Finally: “The Producers” hits the NFCT stage https://robins-island.org/finally-the-producers-hits-the-nfct-stage/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 10:57:40 +0000 https://robins-island.org/finally-the-producers-hits-the-nfct-stage/ Pictured above: Dance rehearsals for “The Producers” were underway on April 19. As the world shut down in March 2020, the North Fork Community Theater geared up for a long-held dream – a production of Mel Brooks’ ridiculously elaborate musical “The Producers.” It had taken a long time for the theater company to secure the […]]]>

Pictured above: Dance rehearsals for “The Producers” were underway on April 19.

As the world shut down in March 2020, the North Fork Community Theater geared up for a long-held dream – a production of Mel Brooks’ ridiculously elaborate musical “The Producers.”

It had taken a long time for the theater company to secure the rights to perform the play, but live theater was on the banned list at the height of the pandemic.

After two years of thinking just two weeks into the future – maybe we’ll reopen in two weeks, then another two weeks, then another, then planning smaller drama productions that were less likely to fill the house – the theater is now set to open its doors on May 12 for its first musical production since before the world turned upside down.

And this show, bets director Mary Motto Kalich, is the perfect antidote to the stress of these trying times.

“The Producers,” based on the 1967 film of the same name, is the story of a broke Broadway producer whose new accountant convinces him to find investors for a production that is guaranteed to fail, enabling him to keep the money he’d raised. But they don’t quite get what they expected with their show, a cartoon of Nazis called “Springtime for Hitler.”

“It’s a buddy comedy. It’s almost their love story,” Ms. Kalich said during a recent choreography rehearsal as the Mattituck theater room filled with tap dancing. “It’s ridiculous, silly, fun and joyful. We all need it. Presales are higher and earlier than ever. That’s the power of this show. It’s almost never done, because it’s a behemoth.

With 26 actors playing an average of about five other supporting roles, 150 props to follow, and costumes so elaborate that an ensemble member has nine costume changes, chaos was controlled in the theater three weeks from the evening of opening. But everyone seemed happy to be there.

“We have a strong team that is dedicated to taking full ownership of their share,” said Ms. Kalich. That team includes choreographer Alyssa Kelly, prop master Stephen Ness, who has been ready for this production “since the dawn of time,” said Ms. Kalich, Vanessa Price’s costume designer, stage manager Rowland Hautsch and musical director Dina Mondello.

Mike Hipp, a frequent NFCT stage presence who also did the set design for this show, will play Leo, the accountant played by Gene Wilder in the film, while Nick Motlenski plays producer Max, the film’s Zero Mostel character.

This production was originally cast in March 2020, just before the first Covid shutdown, which forced the actors into online rehearsals, where they did their best to learn the dance steps and songs and started performing. their replies. But it was not to be.

While many actors return, some, like Mr. Motlenski, are new to the cast.

“It’s the role of a lifetime,” said Ms. Kalich. “He had a previous commitment two years ago, but now he can play the part.”

Julia Cappiello was an 18-year-old freshman when she was cast as Ulla, the Swedish actress the duo hire as their secretary to help them run the production.

“I feel more confident in the role,” she said as she prepared to take the stage for dance rehearsal. “Two years ago, we kept saying, well at least we’ll know the songs…at least we’ll have done the blocking” for the show that never happened.

But Ms. Cappiello has made the most of the pandemic, getting involved in every drama production the theater has put on over the past two years, even directing a virtual production of “Clue” with a cast of actors from around the world. of university age returning from school without a theater outlet for their talents.

Associate producers Michael and Emilie Corey, longtime supporters of the theater, will serve as guest producers for the opening night, May 12.

In keeping with the spirit of community theatre, each performance will have a guest producer from among community leaders, who will play the role of prison guards.

On opening night, Thursday, May 12, Michael and Emilie Corey of The Corey Foundation, longtime benefactors of the theater and actual associate producers of this show, will do the honors as guest producers.

“They helped launch this show because a show like this is not in our budget,” Ms. Kalich said.

Other guest producers include CAST Executive Director Kathy Demeroto, Paul Romanelli of Suffolk Security and the Eastern Long Island Hospital Foundation, Jeff Strong of Strong’s Marine, Long Island Wine Council Chairman and Paumanok Vineyard and Palmer Vineyards Kareem Massoud , Lori Cohen of North Fork Women, Jill Schroeder of JABS, Amy Loeb, CEO of Peconic Bay Medical Center, and Stacey Soloviev.

“They come from all parts of the community and all different networks, and they’re all excited to be on stage for two minutes,” Ms. Kalich said. “Theatre is about involving the community. They have to come here and put on a costume and rehearse their lines. It helps us build community.

The theater, which underwent a major overhaul of its basement rehearsal space, orchestra pit, lighting and stage just before the pandemic, is currently working on an auditorium redesign campaign. Renovations to the downstairs bathrooms are currently underway.

The theater has a $100,000 donation right now.

During a recent rehearsal of “The Producers” |. photo courtesy of Mary Motto Kalich

“The next level is aesthetics,” Ms. Kalich said. “The seats were old from Westhampton Air Force Base – they were done with them in 1982. We have volunteers who tighten the bolts on them every week.”

Volunteers are currently sprucing up the theatre, sanding and touching up paint in anticipation of the community returning to their theater this year, and a plan is underway to renovate the lobby area where spectators enter. theater.

The theater’s annual Building on Tradition gala will take place on Saturday, June 11 at Veteran’s Beach in Mattituck, with a matinee and evening session. The members of Youth on Stage will present a review of some highlights of their work, ahead of their summer production of “Rent,” which begins July 21.

“We sell tickets to pay for the shows, and then we fundraise for the building,” Ms. Kalich said. “The pandemic has been a difficult time to start fundraising. Art is very important and necessary, but not at the same level as what happened in the last two years.

“The Producers” opens Thursday, May 12 and runs through Sunday, May 29, with performances at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 and are available online at nfct.com or by calling the box office at 631.298.6328.

—BHY

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Agnes ‘Sis’ Stark, 88 – RiverheadLOCAL https://robins-island.org/agnes-sis-stark-88-riverheadlocal/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 19:28:41 +0000 https://robins-island.org/agnes-sis-stark-88-riverheadlocal/ Agnes “Sis” Stark of Calverton, died at Peconic Bay Medical Center on April 27, 2022. She was 88. She was born on May 10, 1933 in Astoria, Queens, the daughter of Catherine and Dr. James DeRose. She graduated from St. Angela Hall Academy in Brooklyn, then earned an undergraduate degree from Marymount College in Tarrytown, […]]]>

Agnes “Sis” Stark of Calverton, died at Peconic Bay Medical Center on April 27, 2022. She was 88.

She was born on May 10, 1933 in Astoria, Queens, the daughter of Catherine and Dr. James DeRose. She graduated from St. Angela Hall Academy in Brooklyn, then earned an undergraduate degree from Marymount College in Tarrytown, New York. Agnes put her business degree to work for the Today Show in New York after graduation.

She spends her summers in Laurel and meets there Bruce Stark, her future husband. Shortly after marrying Bruce, she became a Marine Corps bride and moved to Quantico, Virginia, where Bruce was stationed as an officer.

After returning to Long Island, they founded Stark Mobile Homes on Riverleigh Avenue. Sensing a good business opportunity, they soon founded Glenwood Village with Doug and Diane Stark. Sis left the fledgling family business to raise her two children, Brian and Sharon.

She was a member of the Riverhead Board of Education in the 1970s. She also co-founded, with her friend Mary Lundberg, the Riverhead Community Awareness Program (CAP) and was currently a member of the organization’s board of directors. In the 1980s, she returned to school and obtained a master’s degree in social work. For several years she was employed by the North Fork Family Service League where she counseled many people.

Agnes had many diverse interests. She enjoyed playing bridge, working out and managing property. She was an active parishioner at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church and said her faith was the most important part of her life. She loved the New York Giants (football), Mets and Providence College Brethren. Most who knew her will remember that she also loved a good political discussion.

She loved Earl, her son-in-law, and Mary, her daughter-in-law, as her own children. She also loved her two grandchildren, Kendall and Devin, and was always up to date on their progress.

Predeceased by her husband in 1991, she is survived by her son, Brian (Mary) Stark of Jamesport, her daughter Sharon (Earl) Truland of Aquebogue, and her grandchildren, Devin Stark of Laurel and Kendall Stark of Washington, DC She is also survived by her brothers, James (Toni) DeRose of Fort Meyers, Florida, Joe (Rosemary) DeRose of Longwood, Florida and Robert DeRose of Laurel.

The family will receive visitors Monday, May 2 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Tuthill-Mangano Funeral Home, 406 E. Main Street, Riverhead.

Memorial donations may be made to St. Jude Children’s Hospital, Riverhead CAP and the Peconic Bay Medical Center Foundation.

A funeral mass will be celebrated Tuesday at 10 a.m. at Notre-Dame du Bon Conseil Church, 14300 Main Road, Mattituck. Interment will follow at St. John’s Cemetery in Riverhead.

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Joe Gergela, 66, known as a passionate advocate for Long Island farmers https://robins-island.org/joe-gergela-66-known-as-a-passionate-advocate-for-long-island-farmers/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 21:08:59 +0000 https://robins-island.org/joe-gergela-66-known-as-a-passionate-advocate-for-long-island-farmers/ Joe Gergela, whose name has become synonymous with the Long Island Farm Bureau during his 26 years as executive director, died March 25, 2022 at his home in Boynton Beach, Florida. He was 66 years old. Gergela was a strong advocate for Long Island farmers and the preservation of agriculture on Long Island. “The Farm […]]]>

Joe Gergela, whose name has become synonymous with the Long Island Farm Bureau during his 26 years as executive director, died March 25, 2022 at his home in Boynton Beach, Florida. He was 66 years old.

Gergela was a strong advocate for Long Island farmers and the preservation of agriculture on Long Island.

“The Farm Bureau has been his life for many, many years,” his wife Donna said in an interview Tuesday.

And in many ways, Gergela was the Farm Bureau.

“The Long Island Farm Bureau and the farmers of Long Island have lost a friend and a mentor and we will all miss Joe, who played such a big role in our lives,” said Rob Carpenter, Gergela’s successor as LI director. Farm Bureau.

“Joe has faced many challenges head-on for farmers – land use rights, zoning issues, agricultural uses, regulations, right to farm issues, farmland preservation and many other things, too many to list,” Carpenter said. . “Farmers today still benefit from the legacy Joe created and the laws Joe helped enact.”

His friends and associates recalled his effectiveness as a defender.

“For so many years he was the face of Long Island agriculture and a strong advocate for the farming community,” former state senator Ken LaValle said. “His advocacy has led to the passage of laws and programs to conserve farmland and help the farming community thrive,” he said.

“Joe Gergela was the voice of the farmer and the agricultural industry from Riverhead to Albany to Washington DC,” said Assemblyman Fred Thiele. “He worked tirelessly to protect farmland as a resource, agriculture as an industry and, above all, the farming families and traditions that make the East End special,” he said. -he declares. “He was often the voice of consensus to get things done, as he did as a stakeholder to help pass the Community Preservation Fund and the Central Pine Barrens Act,” Thiele said.

Riverhead Councilman Frank Beyrodt, a turf farmer and former president of the LI Farm Bureau, said Gergela “stands for the preservation of agriculture on Long Island. Period.” Beyrodt said he spent a lot of time with Gergela and the two “formed a great relationship.” Gergela had a knack for bringing people together to make sure farming continued on Long Island.

“He came at the right time for the farming community,” Beyrodt said. “He was a force to be reckoned with, that’s for sure.”

“Joe was one of the last of the greats,” said Southold supervisor Scott Russell. “He was always direct, always honest. You knew where you were with him – and in my job, that’s refreshing,” he said. “He had a deep commitment. He made sure agriculture was always top of mind in our minds.

Gergela understood farmers had to adapt to survive, said Bill Talmage, a scion of a multi-generational farming family from Baiting Hollow.

Gergela was the son of a potato farmer from Jamesport. After the death of her grandfather, Gergela left university after two years to work on the family farm.

“Life was good until 1982,” Gergela recalls just before his retirement in 2014. Then a freak snowstorm in April followed by torrential rains and falling potato prices brought his family to the brink of financial ruin.

“At the end of the day, we lost a quarter of a million dollars,” Gergela said in 2014.

He spoke of his shock one evening that fall when he went out to close the barn doors.

“I found my father with a rope over the barn beam,” Gergela recalls in a thick voice. He had arrived in time to prevent his father from carrying out his intention, but it was a red flag.

Gergela later told her father that he had to sell the farm and find another job. Diabetic since the age of 7, he knew he would not be able to support the farm in the long term. “I said to him, ‘The reality is that I won’t be able to do the work that you did and for me it’s probably a good idea to do something else.’ So we farmed the following years to get out of debt and we were able to sell the farm,” Gergela said.

Talmage said he knew Gergela while still cultivating. They were both members of Long Island Young Farmers and Ranchers, he said. “You had to be under 30.” Talmage was already a board member of the LI Farm Bureau, and Gergela would eventually become executive director.

“I remember when they had to sell the farm. I was transitioning from potatoes to greenhouses,” Talmage recalls. “I said to my grandfather, ‘A five-pound bag of ice cubes costs more than a five-pound bag of potatoes. It won’t come back this time.

“Joe has helped a lot of people. He had a good life. That’s really all we can hope for – to have a good life and help people,” Talmage said.

“We will never forget all of his contributions to helping ours become a viable industry,” Kareem Massoud, president of the Long Island Wine Council of Paumanock Vineyards told Aquebogue. “He was a tireless defender.”

Massoud, a former LI Farm Bureau board member, and other colleagues spoke of Gergela’s upbeat and positive personality. “He was always fun to be around. He made you laugh,” Massoud said. “Joe was always in a good mood, even when he faced incredible hardships himself. He was an inspiration.

Beyrodt said Gergela made him laugh a lot. “He was great fun.”

Mitchell Pally, CEO of the Long Island Builders Institute and close personal friend of Gergela, recalled meeting him when Gergela enrolled in a political science course that Pally taught at Stony Brook University, where Gergela has completed her baccalaureate.

“We became close friends,” Pally said. “We played a lot of golf together. Our wives have become good friends. It was a beautiful relationship,” he recalls. “We miss him sorely.”

While his “main focus” was agricultural issues, Pally said, “he worked on things that helped Long Island as a whole.”

Among other things, Gergela served on the board of the Peconic Bay Medical Center.

Andrew Mitchell, president and CEO of the Peconic Bay Medical Center Foundation and former president and CEO of the medical center, remembered Gergela as “a dedicated member of the PBMC Board of Directors, whose passion for local agriculture and unique interest in politics have combined to create a powerful and extremely constructive force for our community.

Joseph Michael Gergela III was born at Eastern Long Island Hospital in Greenport on November 22, 1955, the son of Joseph Jr. and Grace Elizabeth “Betty” (Hills.)

He married Donna Bieselin on February 5, 1977 at St. John’s Church in Center Moriches. They had two children and lived in Manorville before moving to Boyton Beach, Florida after Gergela retired from the LI Farm Bureau in 2014.

Gergela enjoyed playing golf and, above all, enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren, his wife said.

Besides his wife of 45 years, he is survived by his daughter, Elizabeth Mittenthal (Joshua) of Boca Raton, Florida, and his son Jonathan (Samantha) of Baltimore, as well as his grandsons, Grayson and Cayden Mittenthal. He is also survived by his siblings, Cynthia Kissner, Douglas and John. He was predeceased by his sister Joanne Smith in 2011.

The family is planning a celebration of life this summer.

Memorial donations can be made to Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

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🌱 Man Shoots Teen Over Doorbell Prank + Holbrook Hit-and-Run Arrest https://robins-island.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-man-shoots-teen-over-doorbell-prank-holbrook-hit-and-run-arrest/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 22:08:18 +0000 https://robins-island.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-man-shoots-teen-over-doorbell-prank-holbrook-hit-and-run-arrest/ Hello, people of Miller Place-Rocky Point! It’s me again, your host for the Miller Place-Rocky Point Daily. First, today’s weather forecast: Partly sunny and cool. High: 56 Low: 49. Here are the top three stories from Miller Place-Rocky Point today: A Laurel man was arrested and charged with shooting a teenager in the arm Thursday […]]]>

Hello, people of Miller Place-Rocky Point! It’s me again, your host for the Miller Place-Rocky Point Daily.


First, today’s weather forecast:

Partly sunny and cool. High: 56 Low: 49.


Here are the top three stories from Miller Place-Rocky Point today:

  1. A Laurel man was arrested and charged with shooting a teenager in the arm Thursday night with a shotgun. It happened at 9:04 p.m. on Peconic Bay Boulevard in Laurel. James Moshier, 64, reportedly shot the boy for ringing his doorbell and running away. (Patch)
  2. A witness to an alleged hit-and-run in Holbrook on Thursday followed the driver home and called 911, leading to the arrest of Pauline Ross, 71, of East Patchogue.. Police said she was driving on North Ocean Avenue at 10:20 p.m. when she hit a man walking on the roadway and continued driving. (Subscription: press day)
  3. Stop & Shop next month will close an underperforming store in Islandia in May. The approximately 69,000 square foot supermarket is located in the Islandia Mall and will close on May 12. (Patch)

Today at Miller Place-Rocky Point:


From my notebook:

  • This two-bedroom waterfront cottage on Lake Wildwood in Riverhead has annual taxes of just $3,197 and is listed at $399,000. The 800-square-foot, one-bathroom home on Lake Avenue is on a third of an acre on the lake. (Subscription: press day)
  • Joel Hurowitz and Scott McLennan, professors of geology at Stony Brook University, were instrumental in building Perseverance, NASA’s Mars landing spacecraft. (Subscription: press day)
  • Suffolk County Community College has voted to freeze full-time tuition at $2,735 for the third consecutive year. (Smithtown Matters)

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You’re all caught up for today. I’ll be in your inbox tomorrow morning with another update!

Jackie

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