Peconic bay – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 16:58:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://robins-island.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T005401.436.png Peconic bay – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ 32 32 The Tesla Science Center: Launching a Global Museum and Science Center | Events https://robins-island.org/the-tesla-science-center-launching-a-global-museum-and-science-center-events/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 16:58:48 +0000 https://robins-island.org/the-tesla-science-center-launching-a-global-museum-and-science-center-events/ October 13, 2022 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. On line This event is part of the Industry Leaders Conference Series, sponsored by the College of Engineering and Computing Sciences. The Tesla Science Center at Wardenclyffe launches an international museum and science center at the historic site of Nikola Tesla’s last laboratory, located on Long Island […]]]>

October 13, 2022
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

On line

This event is part of the Industry Leaders Conference Series, sponsored by the College of Engineering and Computing Sciences.

The Tesla Science Center at Wardenclyffe launches an international museum and science center at the historic site of Nikola Tesla’s last laboratory, located on Long Island in Shoreham, New York. Nikola Tesla is a famous inventor whose work with AC electric motors and distribution, wireless technology, radio, remote control, and many other inventions transformed our lives and launched the modern age of technology. Tesla’s lab was saved thanks to world-record crowdfunding that raised $1.4 million in six weeks, from 33,000 donors representing more than 108 countries and all 50 states. Construction begins this year to open the site to the public, offering exhibit and programming both on-site and virtually, celebrating Tesla and its inventions as well as innovation in general past, present and future. We celebrate innovators like Tesla who advance humanity through invention. This conference will be an introduction to this project and this vision.

Register

About the Industry Leaders Speaker Series

Dean Babak D. Beheshti, Ph.D., NYIT College of Engineering and Computing Sciences, hosts the Industry Leaders Lecture Series, offering students and practitioners a chance to hear and interact with professionals distinguished from the tech industry.

Working professionals and undergraduate and graduate students are invited to attend and learn from the ideas of these leaders. The series offers attendees a unique opportunity to ask questions about career choices and hear advice and stories directly from experts in the field. All lectures will be live and webcast, and select speakers will present in person at the New York Tech campus in New York or Long Island.

Certifications will be awarded to New York Tech students, upon request, for those who attend two of the three sessions.

Speaker

Marc Alessi is a lawyer and start-up entrepreneur, he brings to his role at the Tesla Science Center years of experience in the nonprofit sector as executive director of the New York State Business Incubator Association, as as board member of Peconic Bay Medical Center and Northwell Health, former board member of East End Arts Council, Nassau Suffolk Law Services and Long Island Power Authority. As a former Assemblyman, Mr. Alessi was instrumental in securing an $850,000 grant from New York State to help preserve Tesla ownership. This grant, which required matching, was behind the world-record crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo that raised $1.4 million in six weeks from 108 countries and 33,000 investors worldwide.

Mr. Alessi has helped launch and fund a number of technology startups on Long Island and is focused on making our region a region that rivals and complements other innovation hotspots around the world. In addition to his role at Tesla, Marc is Executive Director of the Business Incubator Association of New York State, a trade association that includes more than 100 incubators around New York that house and mentor more than 3,000 startups each year. Mr. Alessi’s experience in start-ups is essential to launching operations here at the Centre. He sees the Tesla Science Center in Wardenclyffe as an important temple of technology that speaks to the history of innovation, celebrates and promotes the current role of innovation in our lives, and inspires future inventors like Nikola Tesla to embrace the science and innovation to change the world. .


Host/Moderator

Babak Beheshti

Babak D. BeheshtiPh.D., Professor and Dean, NYIT College of Engineering and Computing Sciences

Babak’s experience in higher education spans over 35 years, where he has served as a full-time faculty member, Chair of the Academic Senate, Associate Dean, and Dean. As Dean, Babak led the engineering school in the introduction of its first two doctorates. programs, in computer science and engineering, two new bachelor’s programs and a new master’s program, in addition to leading the college through its fastest rise in national rankings: #33 best undergraduate engineering programs (national – no PhD) – up 13 places since 2020, and #191 Best Computer Science Undergraduate Programs (National – no PhD), a new ranking in 2021 – up 40 places since 2020.

In line with New York Tech’s career-focused mission, Babak led the College of Engineering and Computing Sciences in building strong partnership with industry and government organizations including NASA, Zscaler, IBM Red Hat, Xilinx , Soter Technologies and Zebra. Technologies.

Babak was a board member of the IEEE (2018-19) and a board member of the Long Island Software and Technology Network (LISTnet). In 2022, he is a member of the Educational Activities Council and Chairman of the Continuing Education Committee. He also sits on the board of directors of IgniteLI—Long Island Manufacturing Consortium and is a member of the advisory board of the International Association of Transportation Regulators.

He is the recipient of the IEEE MGA Leadership Award, the IEEE Millennium Medal, the Athanasios Papoulis Outstanding Educator Award from the IEEE LI Section, and three IEEE Region 1 Awards, including the IEEE Northeast Region Technical Innovation Award in 2008.

He got his doctorate. in electrical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, and his master’s and bachelor’s degrees in electrical engineering from Stony Brook University.

Learn more about Dean Beheshti »

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Businesses continue to feel impact after Stony Brook incubator walk-in oven explosion https://robins-island.org/businesses-continue-to-feel-impact-after-stony-brook-incubator-walk-in-oven-explosion/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 10:08:23 +0000 https://robins-island.org/businesses-continue-to-feel-impact-after-stony-brook-incubator-walk-in-oven-explosion/ The Stony Brook incubator in Calverton. (Credit: Melissa Azofeifa) Eight weeks after an explosion at Stony Brook University’s food business incubator in Calverton, the more than 70 food startups that depend on the shared space continue to feel its impact. With no firm reopening date for the facility, which launched in 2012 to provide shared […]]]>

Eight weeks after an explosion at Stony Brook University’s food business incubator in Calverton, the more than 70 food startups that depend on the shared space continue to feel its impact.

With no firm reopening date for the facility, which launched in 2012 to provide shared kitchen and storage space to support food startups across Long Island, many entrepreneurs have had to scramble to come up with solutions. alternative production plans. Economic experts estimated that the businesses collectively suffered more than $600,000 in economic losses as a result of the incident.

“It will have a catastrophic impact on many businesses there,” said Jimmy Lyons, who opened North Fork Donuts with his wife, Kelly, in Mattituck in 2018 and expanded to a second Bay Shore location in 2020. .

When they started the business, the couple made everything on-site in Mattituck, worked long hours and often arrived at 1 or 2 a.m. to start rising the dough.

“We were running out of donuts at 10 or 11 a.m.,” Mr. Lyons said. “We realized quite quickly that we needed more equipment and space.”

The incubator offered a perfect solution for the fledgling company, which began renting space there about two years ago.

Fortunately, Mr. Lyons said their operation was not directly impacted by the August 10 explosion, as his company’s space is on another side of the building. However, Stony Brook shut down the entire facility as a precaution for cleaning, repairs and safety inspections, leaving Mr. Lyons unable to access his production equipment.

“Initially, we held on,” he said, adding that he had been told the explosion would lead to a “brief” shutdown of the facility. Both North Fork Donuts locations closed when Mr Lyons took to social media to share updates on the reopening and ongoing delays. Mr Lyons, who said he continued to pay his staff of around 30 during the disruption, estimates the company suffered losses of around $300,000 between August 10 and September 9, when the two sites of North Fork Donut have reopened through the use of a temporary kitchen. space elsewhere.

The explosion at the incubator occurred in a gas oven, injuring an employee and rendering a large oven unusable. Stony Brook officials noted that the employee made a full recovery.

The explosion also caused extensive damage to building systems, which affected equipment, gas and electrical distribution to adjacent areas, and damaged finishes to walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture.

According to an FAQ on the incubator’s website, a team of professional carpenters, electricians, plumbers and cleaning crews work at the facility daily to resolve critical repair and maintenance issues before it cannot safely reopen. Officials said each device is inspected, calibrated and tested to ensure it can operate safely and the building’s fire alarm will also need to be inspected before it can reopen.

In a statement, Lawrence Zacarese, vice president of enterprise risk management and director of security at Stony Brook University, said that “a plan [is] in place for a partial reopening of the building by the end [September] once security checks and inspections have been completed. The FAQ notes, however, that new walk-in ovens could arrive as late as mid-November.

Zacarese also said the university is consulting with the Long Island Food Council and Suffolk County to identify other locations for businesses, including the East End Food Institute.

“We take the impact of this temporary shutdown on the incubator community seriously, and repairs, upgrades and improvements are underway to get the incubator back into service safely and as quickly as possible,” said said Mr. Zacarese.

To help businesses stay afloat during this time of uncertainty, a GoFundMe account was set up by the Suffolk County Alliance of Chambers to help offset their economic losses.

“Many growers invest their dreams and even life savings in their businesses,” the fundraising page says, noting that more than three-quarters of businesses housed at the incubator are women or minority-owned.

Many area businesses are also local to the North Fork, including Satur Farms, which uses the facility to produce a range of organic dressings to accompany their green salads, and Peconic Escargot, which uses the kitchen space to process and package their snails. .

The GoFundMe campaign has generated about $3,645 in donations so far, and its organizers said they are asking for help primarily from the private and corporate sectors and philanthropists.

In the meantime, many growers have had to look for other options.

Stephanie Knorzer, owner of The Cookie Shop at Centereach, said she doesn’t know how long her business will remain closed. But she knows it won’t reopen this year.

With no details from Stony Brook on when the incubator would reopen, Ms Knorzer and her husband, Mike, made the decision to build a kitchen in their store.

“It’s very difficult to find a good architect to fit out an entire kitchen in a small 1,000 square foot retail store,” she said.

While Stony Brook said the incubator could partially reopen, Ms Knorzer said she particularly needed access to the walk-in ovens. “With so many other businesses struggling to get in there, I can imagine it’s going to be a zoo where we’re all trying to book our time and cook stuff,” she said.

An architect she works with told them not to expect to open until February 2023. “We don’t have an endgame in sight as to when it will open, but that’s our plan,” said said Ms. Knorzer.

Mr Lyons said earlier this week that his company is still working out a permanent solution. “The community has been amazing – reaching out, providing kitchen and fridge space,” he said. “It was really cool; it was a stampede.

He pointed out that the timing of the disaster could not have been worse since, particularly in Mattituck, revenue generated during the busy summer month of August helps to financially offset the quiet winter months.

He described Stony Brook’s response as “extremely frustrating”.

“It’s not my hobby – it’s how I feed my family,” he said, though he remains determined to stay open. “We have to grind a little harder this fall to try to make up for this month.”

While some growers don’t plan to return to the Calverton plant, others are still hoping it will be temporary.

Milla Benevides of Milla’s Puffs has rented space in Deer Park to get by, but is eager to return to the incubator to make her pão de queijo, or cheese puffs, a Brazilian staple made from cassava root, d of eggs, milk and cheese. Its products can be found locally in several East End stores.

Estimating she has lost $10,000 so far, Ms Benevides said in an interview on Tuesday that her freezer had been damaged and she had gone two weeks without being able to deliver her puffs to more than 25 locations on Long Island, New York and Connecticut.

Since she doesn’t need to use the ovens, she plans to return to the incubator as soon as it partially reopens, which could be as early as next week.

Despite the difficulties, Ms Benevides remains confident that all will be well and hopes for relief through the GoFundMe.

“I think we have to be positive. I am like the grasshopper,” she said. “I don’t jump back, I don’t jump sideways, I jump forward. We have to understand that everything happens for a reason and that we can change the scenario by showing our positivity.

]]> Views of Peconic Bay and Cases Creek from this Aquebogue property https://robins-island.org/views-of-peconic-bay-and-cases-creek-from-this-aquebogue-property/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 10:01:33 +0000 https://robins-island.org/views-of-peconic-bay-and-cases-creek-from-this-aquebogue-property/ Looking at it from Peconic Bay Boulevard, you might not be able to tell how special this week’s dream home is. At first glance, you’re greeted by a well-maintained home and meticulously landscaped property, but it’s what’s behind it that’s the real draw. “It’s the views that make this place great,” said listing agent Valerie […]]]>

Looking at it from Peconic Bay Boulevard, you might not be able to tell how special this week’s dream home is.

At first glance, you’re greeted by a well-maintained home and meticulously landscaped property, but it’s what’s behind it that’s the real draw.

“It’s the views that make this place great,” said listing agent Valerie Goode of Colony Realty, and we have to agree.

The south side of the house offers views of Peconic Bay and Cases Creek.

Views of Cases Creek and the canal are flanked on both sides by grassy meadows. The stream was ceded in 1701 to Southold Town by the family of Henry Case and is protected providing views forever.

Extending further south, expansive views of Peconic Bay are especially enjoyed from the second floor of the home.

The four-bedroom, two-bathroom home features a sunny kitchen with an open and spacious center island and access to the patio for outdoor dining. There is also a cedar porch perfect for morning coffee and a good book or for entertaining guests with its built-in bar.

“There is a beautiful large living room with a wood burning fireplace and hardwood floors. There’s also plenty of flexible space for a home office, gym or guest bedroom,” Goode told us. “This home is relaxing, welcoming and a great space for large gatherings.”

Outside is an enclosed plunge pool that overlooks the meadows and water views.

The patio surrounded by established plantings has a hot tub and plenty of space for outdoor dining and enjoyment.

There is also a deeded sandy beach at the end of the cross street.

The property is listed at $1,295,000.

See the full list here.

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Northwell Health Exceeds $1 Billion Goal in First Systemwide Fundraising Campaign https://robins-island.org/northwell-health-exceeds-1-billion-goal-in-first-systemwide-fundraising-campaign/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 13:03:00 +0000 https://robins-island.org/northwell-health-exceeds-1-billion-goal-in-first-systemwide-fundraising-campaign/ NEW HYDE PARK, NY–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Northwell Health, New York State’s largest nonprofit healthcare provider and private employer, today announced that it has surpassed the $1 billion goal in its first all-encompassing fundraising campaign. system-wide. Funds raised have accelerated innovation and improved the quality of healthcare in the New York area and beyond. Ahead of the Impossible: […]]]>

NEW HYDE PARK, NY–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Northwell Health, New York State’s largest nonprofit healthcare provider and private employer, today announced that it has surpassed the $1 billion goal in its first all-encompassing fundraising campaign. system-wide. Funds raised have accelerated innovation and improved the quality of healthcare in the New York area and beyond.

Ahead of the Impossible: The Northwell Campaign supports Northwell’s promise to the people and communities it serves. The campaign, which launched publicly in October 2018, supports capital projects, improves hospitals and clinical programs, advances research and funds endowment. Since its inception, nearly 170,000 donors, including individuals, corporations and foundations, have contributed more than $1.02 billion to support the following areas:

  • Programmatic donations totaling $422 million;

  • Capital donations totaling $412 million;

  • Endowment donations totaling $186 million.

“We don’t believe in limits. We set a goal to raise $1 billion and we did it,” said the President and CEO of Northwell Health. Michael Dowling. “The extraordinary generosity of our donors has dramatically spurred advances in research, education, prevention and treatment. Philanthropy is an investment in each other, in our community and in the future, and it saves and improves people’s lives.

Best achievements of programmatic, capital and endowment campaigns

Funds raised to date have supported significant advancements in the Northwell service area, including the establishment of Sandra Atlas Bass Heart Hospital, Clifford and Randi Lane Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit, Beverly Advanced Surgery Pavilion and Attilio Petrocelli, of the Rahat & S. Zaki Hossain Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit, Sandra Atlas Bass Center for Liver Diseases, and Helen & Alan Greene Lobby of North Shore University Hospital; the Katz Women’s Surgical Center at Glen Cove Hospital; Corey Critical Care Pavilion and Kanas Regional Cardiac Center at Peconic Bay Medical Center; the Entenmann Family Campus and Bohlsen Neuroscience Center at South Shore University Hospital; the Children’s Medical Fund Center for Diagnostic Studies, the Damaghi Family Pediatric Surgical Operating Complex, and the Gertrude and Louis Feil Post-Anesthesia Care Unit at Cohen Children’s Medical Center; the Seema Boesky Heart Center at Northern Westchester Hospital; the Friedman Transgender Health and Wellness Program at Lenox Hill Hospital; the Florina Cancer Center at the University of Staten Island and the Imbert Cancer Center in Bay Shore, NY; the addition of multiple care centers at Northwell Hospitals to enhance the patient and family experience; and advancing work in clinical trials, neuroscience, autoimmunity, and bioelectronic medicine at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research. For a full list of landmark and programmatic achievements, visit give.northwell.edu/campaignachievements.

A substantial amount of $186 million was raised during the Overcome the impossible campaign to support Northwell’s thriving endowment program, which provides in perpetuity financial support to support key leaders, faculty positions and programs. In particular, $60 million in support — nearly a third of the total endowment — came from Donald and Barbara Zucker for scholarship support and to train the next generation of Donald-style healthcare professionals. and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell and the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research. Additionally, a transformational gift to endow the Katz Institute for Women’s Health ensures the advancement of care to meet and address the unique health needs of women. Donor support has also created 13 newly endowed Chairs and Chairs since the launch of the campaign, enabling Northwell to increase recruitment and attract the most talented researchers, clinicians and scholars. To learn more about staffing at Northwell, visit give.northwell.edu/endowment.

Employees Support Northwell’s Mission and Fuel Campaign Success

Campaign donors include 11,600 employees, including 100% of Northwell executives, who have contributed more than $15 million to the campaign. Employees supported areas across Northwell, including the Caregiver Support Fund, which was established to help Northwell team members whose families have been financially impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and remain in place for those who face adversity.

“When donors support us, they are affirming their faith in Northwell and their commitment to improving health in our communities,” said Brian Lally, senior vice president and chief development officer of Northwell. “Our communities and employees have come together to support the philanthropic needs of our organization. In order to surpass the impossible, our work is never done. We are using this momentum to expand our campaign and provide additional support in critical areas where the need is great.”

Campaign momentum propels extension into new priority areas

With the success of the billion dollar milestone, the Overcome the impossible The campaign will run through December 2024 to raise an additional $400 million. The funds will support four key areas – behavioral health, health equity, cancer and expanding care in Manhattan – in addition to ongoing priorities across Northwell’s footprint, including continued support for employee wellness initiatives and the advancement of care in community hospitals. Objectives in each focus area include:

  • Behavioral health

    • Improve the behavioral health of children and adolescents by creating a unified center of excellence, and by training and recruiting professionals with expertise in pediatric behavioral health and research.

  • Health Equity

    • Bring about transformational change within the communities we serve by focusing on inequities in health care; addressing the social determinants of health; and promote research, education and innovation.

  • Cancer

    • To build a cancer business to include a cancer hospital in the central Northwell region and develop new treatments, expand clinical trials, improve outcomes and offer comprehensive survivorship programs to care for our patients holistically. We treat more New Yorkers diagnosed with cancer than any other health care provider in the state, with nearly 20,000 patients receiving cancer care at Northwell each year, according to inpatient and outpatient surgery data from the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) (2020).

  • manhattan

    • Build a new state-of-the-art outpatient medical pavilion including a cancer center and expand access to care for New Yorkers.

As a not-for-profit organization, Northwell reinvests all funds back into the communities it serves. Philanthropy helps advance medicine by expanding and diversifying clinical trials and propelling innovative approaches to help address society’s systemic challenges by providing high-quality, accessible health care to all communities.

To learn more about Ahead of the Impossible: The Northwell Campaignincluding areas of impact and donors making a difference, visit https://give.northwell.edu/outpacing-impossible. To view the Portraits of Possible campaign success video, visit give.northwell.edu/portraits.

About Northwell Health

Northwell Health is New York State’s largest health care provider and private employer, with 21 hospitals, 850 ambulatory care facilities and more than 12,000 affiliated physicians. We care for more than two million people each year in the New York metropolitan area and beyond, thanks to the philanthropic support of our communities. Our 80,000 employees – 18,900 nurses and 4,900 salaried physicians, including members of Northwell Health Physician Partners – strive to improve healthcare. We make breakthroughs in medicine at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research. We train the next generation of healthcare professionals at the visionary Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell and the Hofstra Northwell School of Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies. For more information on our more than 100 medical specialties, visit Northwell.edu.

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Real estate transfers: September 22, 2022 https://robins-island.org/real-estate-transfers-september-22-2022/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 09:55:36 +0000 https://robins-island.org/real-estate-transfers-september-22-2022/ Lists prepared for Times Review Media Group by Suffolk Research Service, dated August 9-15, 2022. AQUEBUG (11931) • Cataldo, F&M, to Murphy, Thomas, 64 Ida Ln (600-46-1-33.15), (R), $714,000 HOLLOW BAIT (11933) • Jack Straw Realty LLC in Buchs, David, 214 Fox Hill Dr (600-11.1-1-32), (R), $550,000 • Vistas Baiting Hollow at Calvosa Jr, Joseph, […]]]>

Lists prepared for Times Review Media Group by Suffolk Research Service, dated August 9-15, 2022.

AQUEBUG (11931)

• Cataldo, F&M, to Murphy, Thomas, 64 Ida Ln (600-46-1-33.15), (R), $714,000

HOLLOW BAIT (11933)

• Jack Straw Realty LLC in Buchs, David, 214 Fox Hill Dr (600-11.1-1-32), (R), $550,000

• Vistas Baiting Hollow at Calvosa Jr, Joseph, Vistas Baiting Hollow #2102 (600-40.4-1-7), (R), $405,000

• Karpoich, P&D, to Castelforte LLC, 140 Gregory Way (600-58-2-10.19), (R), $700,000

CUTCHOGUE (11935)

• Iannolo, M Trust at 5295 Bridge Lane LLC, 5295 Bridge Ln & 25295 CR48 (1000-84-1-6.16), (V), $550,000

• Spielman, B, to Clark, Brian, 2540 Bridge Ln (1000-85-2-23), (R), $1,275,000

• Mott, M, to Pollock, Stephen, 1490 Skunk Ln (1000-97-3-11.3), (R), $1,475,000

• Gatz, P&V, to McGrath, Michael, 490 Schoolhouse Rd (1000-102-5-10), (R), $680,000

• Rimor Development LLC in Morales, Arthur, Harvest Pointe, Home 34 (1000-102.1-2-8), (R), $760,000

• Rimor Development LLC in Danzer, Meinrad, Harvest Pointe, Home 36 (1000-102.1-2-10), (R), $888,540

• Rimor Development LLC in Oliver, Paul, Harvest Pointe, home #93 (1000-102.1-2-37), (R), $855,000

• Pabst Trust & Nixon, et al at Davies, Julien, 5195 Skunk Ln & lot 2-013 (1000-138-2-4), (R), $825,000

ORIENTAL MARION (11939)

• Rocky Pointe LLC in Leonard, Matthew, 4305 Rocky Point Rd (1000-21-1-21), (R), $1,400,000

• Crotty, J, D and S, to Weingart, Ryan, 1915 Gillette Dr (1000-38-3-12), (V), $225,000

ISLAND OF FISHERMEN (06390)

• Solomon, G, & Flanagan, M, to Bungalow Twelve LLC, Private Rd Off E End Rd (1000-9-1-4), (R), $999,500

FLANDERS (11901)

• Lipari Trust at 56 King Avenue LLC, 56 King Ave (900-123-4-33), (R), $364,000

• Gonzalez, E&M, to Lopez, Robidio, 21 Stern Ave (900-142-1-20.1), (R), $360,500

• Springer, H&C Trusts to Sarv 4 Properties Inc, 43 Oak Ave (900-144-1-107), (R), $350,000

GREEN DOOR (11944)

• DaSilva, L, and LoCascio, J, to Kostopoulos, Dimitrios, 61475 CR 48, Unit 201B (1000-45.1-2-7), (C), $515,000

• Schroer, D&S, to Allacco Jr, Louis, 905 Kerwin Blvd (1000-53-3-4), (R), $660,000

• Arslanyan, L Trust in Willumstad, Pillar, 1280 Sage Blvd (1000-53-5-10), (R), $1,500,000

• Moore, K, to McCulloch, Andrew, 616 Main St. (1001-3-4-4), (R), $955,000

MATTITUCK (11952)

• Fourniotis, M&M, to Papastefanou, John, 1200 Inlet Dr (1000-99-2-7), (R), $640,000

• Oasis at Mattituck Co at Epstein, Evan, 4405 Stanley Rd (1000-106-8-63), (R), $1,475,000

• Zenith Property Group to Oasis at Mattituck Corp, 4405 Stanley Rd (1000-106-8-63), (V), $275,000

PECONIC (11958)

• Gray, T & S, to Armstrong, Jeremy, 5615 Soundview Ave (1000-58-1-2.2), (V), $2,000,000

RIVER HEAD (11901)

• Ottaka, S of Guardian to Coleman, Irving, 7 Smugglers Path (600-8-2-10.5), (R), $629,000

• Red’s Adventures LLC at Gleckler, William, 67 Pier Ave (600-8-3-1.17), (R), $950,000

• Blizzard and Resnick Bliz to Hunstein, David, 1404 Willow Pond Dr (600-18.1-3-86), (R), $549,000

• Sanborn, R, & Hum, T, to Bortin, Benjamin, 1906 Cedar Path (600-18.1-3-120), (R), $345,000

• Aspen Creek Estates in Macua Campos, Martin, 61 AJ Court (600-65-1-4.4), (R), $699,999

• JRE and C LLC in Londono, Johannah, 417 Doctors Path (600-65-2-16), (R), $410,500

• Daniels, S, in Baculima, Hernan, 110 Nadel Dr (600-83-2-20), (R), $450,000

• Save More Homes LLC in Velasquez, Jose, 63 Maple Wood Ln (600-85-1-10.48), (R), $579,900

• Flora and Irwin LLC to HOBLOB 58 LLC, 1414-1428 Old Country Rd (600-101-2-6.2), (V), $14,777,000

• Gibbs, K, to Fisher, Michael, 21 Duryea St (600-102-4-28), (R), $545,000

• Tann, S, to Harrison Avenue LLC, Harrison Ave (600-108-1-1), (V), $1,350,000

• Bozza, R, to Murrin, Joseph, 58 Strawberry Commons (600-109.1-1-58), (R), $370,000

• Israel, I&S, to Martinez Oviedo, Felix, 386 Sweezy Ave (600-123-4-52), (R), $396,500

SHELTER ISLAND (11964)

• Lind, D&E & K&R, to Foley, Michael, 58 Country Club Dr (700-1-2-17), (V), $525,000

SOUTHOLD (11971)

• Baiz, R to Skierczynski, Paul, 1260 Bay Home Rd (1000-56-5-1.2), (V), $600,000

• Wessels, G Trust to O’Connell, Stephen, 1615 Hiawatha’s Path (1000-78-3-58), (R), $699,000

• Peters, T by executor at 225 Williams Drive LLC, 145 Williamsburgh Dr (1000-78-5-13), (R), $350,000

• Catholic Charities in Lacku, Adam, 380 Eds Rd (1000-78-9-67), (R), $790,000

WADING RIVER (11792)

• Henrich, E&D Trusts to Porchia III, John, 1 Baileys Ct (600-73-1-1.26), (R), $999,999

• Vaccarello, F & G, to Mayer Trust, George and Mary, 289 Long Pond Road (600-73-1-8.4), (R), $710,000

• Ramos, W&M, to Singh, Andray, 29 Holly Berry Ct (600-114-1-39.29), (R), $855,000

(Key: Tax Map Numbers = District-Section-Bloc-Lot; (A) = Agriculture; (R) = Residential; (V) = Vacant Property; (C) = Commercial; (R&E) = Recreation and Entertainment; (CS) = community services; (I) = industrial; (PS) = utility; (P) = park land; as determined from assessed values ​​in current tax rolls.)

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Oktoberfest is in full swing this year https://robins-island.org/oktoberfest-is-in-full-swing-this-year/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 18:55:44 +0000 https://robins-island.org/oktoberfest-is-in-full-swing-this-year/ The Oktoberfest season begins today, September 17, with the official return of Oktoberfest Munich after a two-year absence due to the pandemic. The 16 days of festivities will begin with the ceremonial tapping of the first keg of beer by the Mayor of Munich, who opens the party with the Bavarian exclamation “O’zapft is!” (“It’s […]]]>

The Oktoberfest season begins today, September 17, with the official return of Oktoberfest Munich after a two-year absence due to the pandemic. The 16 days of festivities will begin with the ceremonial tapping of the first keg of beer by the Mayor of Munich, who opens the party with the Bavarian exclamation “O’zapft is!” (“It’s bugged”).

The six breweries helped produce the traditional Oktoberfest beer served at the start of the festival, with the beer made with the same ingredients and recipes used every year. The strict German Purity Law of 1487 (Reinheitsgebot) applies, producing the famous marzen beer with a rich golden yellow color.

Beer lovers on Long Island also have plenty of opportunities to celebrate the festival with authentic German marzens, food and music, and traditional contests that have really caught on here, including mug-inducing holding contests. voltage.

Across Long Island, breweries will host Oktoberfest events with beer, food and games.Getty Images

Oktoberfest Events on Long Island

Destination Unknown Beer Co. (DUBCO) in Bay Shore will hold its 4th annual Dubtoberfest on September 17 with German-style beers and pumpkin ales from DUBCO and 14 breweries from the Long Island Brewers Guild.

Other member breweries include Bay Shore neighbors Great South Bay, Ghost Brewing and The Brewers Collective. The festivities will include a mug-holding contest and food from the Geenas Weenas food truck.

Das Biergarten in the West End of Long Beach will host its 8th anniversary celebration of Oktoberfest on September 17 with live music in its tent and German beer and food. The festivities will continue for the next two weekends with live music under the tent.

Plattduetsche Park in Franklin Square, Long Island’s first German beer garden, will hold its Ompahfest on September 18 with live music from German bands parading in the Steuben Day Parade in Manhattan on September 17. There will be plenty of German beer and food, as well as dancing and lots of activities for the kids.

Oktoberfest celebrations will continue at the Plattduetsche Biergarten for the first three weekends of October with live music from German bands such as Die Spitzbaum, Die Schlauberger and Alex Meixmer.

TJ Finley’s at Bay Shore will host its 15th annual Oktoberfest celebration on September 24 with live music, German food and beer, and a mug-holding contest.

Barrier Brewing in Oceanside will hold its first annual Barrier Oktoberfest celebration on September 25 with music from the Bratwurst Boys, dancing and traditional Oktoberfest competitions including tankard holding and hammer strike.

Barrier will offer 10 German-style beers, including Frau Blucher rauchbier, schwarzbier black lager, Oktoberfest marzen, hefeweizen. kolsch and gose. Barrier’s 3rd Rail food truck will also offer a special Bavarian menu.

Tanger Outlets in Deer Park will host its second annual Oktoberfest craft beer festival on October 1, with tastings of locally brewed beer and cider. From 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., the festival will have live music and food will be available for purchase, including German specialties.

Garvies Point Brewery will hold its second annual Oktoberfest celebration on October 9 at its newly expanded brewery and restaurant on the waterfront at Glen Cove. The celebration will include an all-you-can-eat Oktoberfest buffet, cold German-style beers, and mug and costume holding contests.

Greenport Harbor Brewing will hold its Oompahfest on October 16 at the Peconic Brewery with its FestBier, a special menu in its restaurant, a stein-holding contest and live music from Die Spitzbaum.

German restaurants on Long Island are also a great place to celebrate the season with traditional Oktoberfest food and beer. Oak Chalet in Bellmore will have live music on Wednesdays and Thursdays from September 22 through October 27.

Other restaurants include Prost Grill in Garden City, Village Lanterne in Lindenhurst, Pumpernickels in Northport and Shippy’s Pumpernickel in Southampton.

A complete list of Long Island Oktoberfest events is available online at LIBeerGuide.com/li-oktoberfest. Prost!

Bernie Kilkelly is the editor and publisher of LIBeerGuide.com.

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Local premium | Long Island Business News https://robins-island.org/local-premium-long-island-business-news/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 22:10:16 +0000 https://robins-island.org/local-premium-long-island-business-news/ An effort is underway in Riverhead to build a sustainable and equitable food system that will benefit the entire region. Led by the East End Food Institute, a Southampton-based non-profit that encourages partnerships with farmers, food producers and consumers, the initiative is gaining momentum. Developing a Riverhead-based East End Food Hub, the food institute is […]]]>

An effort is underway in Riverhead to build a sustainable and equitable food system that will benefit the entire region.

Led by the East End Food Institute, a Southampton-based non-profit that encourages partnerships with farmers, food producers and consumers, the initiative is gaining momentum. Developing a Riverhead-based East End Food Hub, the food institute is working on a $1.5 million project designed to diversify farmers’ sources of income while ensuring healthy, farm-fresh food for people in the need.

The Food Hub would allow farmers to develop what the U.S. Department of Agriculture “has called a mid-tier value chain, taking advantage of economies of scale to sell more units of stuff for less than a farmer’s income.” diversity,” said Kate Fullam, East End Executive Director of the Food Institute.

“It’s nice to have a diversification of income streams,” Fullam said. “In the East End of Long Island, it’s hard to move things because of traffic” and other challenges, including land, crop, labor and transportation costs. the production.

The Food Hub would centralize the aggregation, processing and distribution of local foods to help create new markets for Long Island producers and their products. At the same time, it would address current inequities related to access to food in institutions such as schools, pantries, and other organizations.

Courtesy of the East End Food Institute

Supporting local food producers is critical for the region, Fullam said, pointing to supply chain debacles that have emerged during the pandemic.

The pandemic has underscored just how “fragile the food system really is,” Fullam said. Helping the farmer build mid-level channels to sell bulk quantities opens up new opportunities for farmers while allowing people to access local food, she added.

“If we don’t invest, we could see supply chain breakdowns,” she said, adding that staple foods that may come from Long Island could otherwise be purchased elsewhere and then have to “cross Long Island Sound or over two bridges to get to us.

Located on the former site of Homeside Florist and Greenhouses, the property that would house the proposed food center is now owned by Paul Pawlowski and Kenneth Balato. Pawlowski and Balato rent the space from the food institute as a long-term tenant. Its location in Riverhead, Fullam said, is at the gateway to the North and South Fork.

Pawlowski said he and his business partner are expanding the property with the food institute as he pursues site plans to expand his food processing and distribution capacity. This includes renovating the existing 5,000 square foot building, which currently houses a year-round farmers’ market.

A rendering of an indoor market at the Food Hub. Courtesy of the East End Food Institute

“It’s a good development for the city, both for Forks and for the community,” Pawlowski said. “I think it’s a good catalyst.”

Plans for the Food Hub’s first phase would be designed to include a farmers’ retail market and other capabilities. This includes a demonstration area for food and nutrition education. Plans call for a 2,000 square foot community kitchen to launch small food and beverage businesses. The food processing area would allow for high value-added processing. A warehouse and cold storage space would consolidate and distribute locally grown and manufactured products. And there are accommodations for short- and long-term food system workers and for people attending public education forums, with a kitchen view.

The East End Food Institute already offers commercial kitchen space. Courtesy of the East End Food Institute

All of this requires funding and community support. The organization has already received an incentive for a $300,000 refund on the $1.5 million project from the first phase of the plans. This achievement would highlight “the validity of the project with the state’s commitment,” Fullam said.

Fullam said the institute is pursuing other rounds of support, including from government agencies and private and corporate donors.

Thursday, a “preview” cocktail at Nick & Toni’s in East Hampton raised funds and shed light on the project. He offered an inside look at the hub’s renders, as well as insight into dedicated programming and the various doors this food hub would open to partner organizations and community members.

“The Riverhead Food Hub project has the potential to contribute significantly to the East End,” said Mark Smith, managing partner of East Hampton-based Honest Man Company, which operates Nick & Toni’s.

“Addressing food insecurity and educating people about food issues is essential for our communities,” said Smith, a member of the institute’s board of trustees.

Entrepreneurs use the institute’s commercial kitchen for food and beverage production. Courtesy of the East End Food Institute

On the cocktail menu were dishes from the institute’s producers, such as Balsam Farms in Amagansett, Mecox Bay Dairy in Water Mill and Treiber Farms in Peconic. Local farms and producers also served specialty cocktails and hors d’oeuvres to showcase the abundance of the region’s bounty.

The institute, with its collaborations with community leaders, has had a number of successes in its commercial kitchen at Stony Brook’s Southampton campus. The institute rents kitchen time and storage space there for the production of food and beverages. This incubator space is where several businesses have sprung up, including Carissa’s Bread and Goodfoodperiod – both of which tout local ingredients – as well as other entrepreneurs “who could start their business without having to invest in infrastructure” , said Fullam.

The institute also works with local food banks which, through programs such as Nourish New York, have “buying power to source local produce,” Fullam said. “They can come through us – we have a virtual farmer’s market.” So when, say, there’s an extra bounty of 1,200 pounds of sweet potatoes, “we can cut them into cubes and freeze them ‘so the food stays fresh’ while it gets to food banks safely. “, she said.

In its work of supporting, promoting and advocating for local farms, the institute conducted a food feasibility study to plan ahead to meet demand.

Now, the organization works with New Venture Advisors, which works with food hubs across the country, as well as other experts and consultants.

And there are plans to expand further. These plans would include a second building with a multi-purpose area to expand the farmer’s market, host community food events and showcase hands-on cooking demonstrations with local producers.

But it can take time.

“It has to be a societal investment,” Fullam said.

AGENN@LIBN.COM

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The 25 best men’s cross country runners for 2022 https://robins-island.org/the-25-best-mens-cross-country-runners-for-2022/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 16:22:16 +0000 https://robins-island.org/the-25-best-mens-cross-country-runners-for-2022/ Newsday’s annual list of top men’s cross country runners for the fall 2022 season, listed alphabetically. Unless otherwise stated, all times are 5 kilometers. Jordan Altman, Syosset, Sr. Nassau’s top returner finished third in Class A at the County State Qualifier at Bethpage State Park. Altman ran 17:07.2 at the Public Schools State Championships at […]]]>

Newsday’s annual list of top men’s cross country runners for the fall 2022 season, listed alphabetically. Unless otherwise stated, all times are 5 kilometers.

Jordan Altman, Syosset, Sr.

Nassau’s top returner finished third in Class A at the County State Qualifier at Bethpage State Park. Altman ran 17:07.2 at the Public Schools State Championships at Chenango Valley State Park.

Douglas Antaky, Smithtown, Jr.

He ran 17:17.97 in Suffolk State qualifying at Sunken Meadow State Park and finished eighth in Class A.

Aidan Brancaccio, Saint-Antoine, Sr.

He placed second in 13:35.46 at the Nassau-Suffolk CHSAA League Championships on the 2.5-mile Sunken Meadow course.

Brandon Cruz, Northport, Jr.

He clocked the fifth fastest time (17:39.40) at the Suffolk Division Championships at Sunken Meadow.

Sean Dearie, St. Anthony’s, Sr.

Dearie ran 17:05.13 at the Ocean State Invitational in Rhode Island and 13:59.80 at the CHSAA 2.5-mile Intersectional Championships at Van Cortlandt Park.

Left to right: Jordan Altman of Syosset, and Aidan Brancaccio and Sean Dearie of St. Anthony’s.

Gavin Giordano, Calhoun, Sr.

He finished 20th overall in 17:11.22 in Nassau State qualifying at Bethpage.

Jake Gogarty, Bay Shore, Jr.

Gogarty is Suffolk’s second-fastest Class A returner. He ran in 17:17.36 in Suffolk State Qualifying at Sunken Meado and finished third in 16:51.12 at the Tom Knipfing Invitational at Fireman’s Field.

Trevor Hayes, Westhampton, Jr.

Hayes ran 16:46.33 in the Suffolk State qualifier at Sunken Meadow. His 16:49.3 at State Public School Championships in Chenango Valley was 15th in Class B at Chenango Valley.

Max Haynia, Westhampton, Sr.

He is the fastest Class B returner in the state after placing seventh in 16:26.9 at the Chenango Valley Public Schools Championships. Haynia finished second in Class B at the Suffolk Division Championships and State Qualifiers at Sunken Meadow.

Jack Higgins, Chaminade, Sr.

Higgins ran 13:54.7 and placed 20th on the 2.5-mile course at Van Cortlandt Park at the CHSAA Intersectional Championships.

William Hughes, Calhoun, Sr.

Hughes finished fifth in Class II in 17:11.19 at the Nassau Class Conference Championships at Bethpage.

Clockwise from top left: Trevor Hayes and Max Haynia of Westhampton,...

Clockwise from top left: Trevor Hayes and Max Haynia of Westhampton, William Hughes of Calhoun and Jack Higgins of Chaminade.

Flynn Klipstein, Southold, Jr.

He won the Class C/D race in 18:03.5 in Suffolk State qualifying at Sunken Meadow. Klipstein is the second-fastest comeback at the Peconic Invitational, where he ran 19:52.71 at Red Creek Park in Hampton Bays last September.

James McNaughton, Northport, Sr.

His 17:31.9 at the Chenango Valley Public Schools State Championships was among the 10 fastest times by a Long Island underclassman.

Patrick Mulryan, Chaminade, Sr.

He ran 14:03.11 on the 2.5-mile Sunken Meadow course and finished seventh at the Nassau-Suffolk CHSAA league championships.

Myles Munro, Seaford, Soph.

Munro placed third in Class III in 17:44.40 at the Nassau Class County Championships in Bethpage.

Anthony O’Brien, Ward Melville, Sr.

O’Brien ran 17:35.1 to finish 16th in Suffolk State qualifying at Sunken Meadow.

John Ortiz, Carey, Sr.

Oritz ran 17:04.3 to finish 15th in Nassau State qualifying at Bethpage.

Jeremy Paredes, St. Anthony’s, Sr.

He is the leading returner at the CHSAA Intersectional Championships, where he ran 13:34.6 and placed fifth on the 2.5-mile course at Van Cortlandt Park.

From left to right, Patrick Mulryan of Chaminade, Myles Munro of Seaford and St....

Left to right are Patrick Mulryan of Chaminade, Myles Munro of Seaford and Jeremy Paredes of St. Anthony.

Chris Payne, Northport, Sr.

He ran 18:03.20 at the Suffolk Division Championships at Sunken Meadow.

Nicolas Sardes, Carey, Sr.

Sardes was 18th in 17:08.93 in Nassau State qualifying at Bethpage.

Logan Schaeffler, Calhoun, Jr.

Schaeffler finished fourth in Class A in 16:21.93 during Nassau State qualifying at Bethpage.

Timothy Sheahan, Northport, Sr.

He is Suffolk’s fastest Class A returner. Sheahan finished sixth in Suffolk State qualifying in 17:06.29 at Sunken Meadow.

From left to right: Chris Payne of Northport, Sam Sturge of North Shore and...

Left to right: Chris Payne of Northport, Sam Sturge of North Shore and Hunter Wilson of St. Anthony.

Sam Sturge, North Shore, Sr.

The defending Nassau Class III champion ran 17:16.93 at the Nassau Class County Championships in Bethpage.

George Thomas, Farmingdale, Soph.

He finished 12th in Class A in 17:05.22 during Nassau State qualifying at Bethpage.

Hunter Wilson, St. Anthony, Sr.

The defending CHSAA league champion from Nassau-Suffolk ran 13:33.35 on the 2.5-mile Sunken Meadow course in the league championship meet.

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The menu: local oysters to take away https://robins-island.org/the-menu-local-oysters-to-take-away/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 10:27:46 +0000 https://robins-island.org/the-menu-local-oysters-to-take-away/ Welcome to the first month of 2022, which for those unaware, is the best time of year for oysters. While long gone are the days of only eating oysters in the colder months thanks to, uh, refrigeration, this time of year is when oysters reach their more desirable lean and firm texture and their bright, […]]]>

Welcome to the first month of 2022, which for those unaware, is the best time of year for oysters. While long gone are the days of only eating oysters in the colder months thanks to, uh, refrigeration, this time of year is when oysters reach their more desirable lean and firm texture and their bright, brackish flavor. Here’s a map of where to find some of our favorite North Fork oysters and where to buy them. Prepare your bullet knives!

Peconic Gold Oysters | Illustration by Kelly Franké
  1. PECONIC GOLD OYSTERS

Oyster name: Little classics, dinosaurs

Taste notes: complex, tasty, smoky

Pair with: Macari Sauvignon Blanc, Sparkling Pointe Blanc de Blancs

Cost: $25/2 dozen

21125 county road. 48 years old, Cutchogue

Peeko Oysters | Illustration by Kelly Franké

2. PEEKO OYSTERS

Oyster name: Peeko Oysters

Taste notes: salty, sweet, nutty

Pair with: Muscadet or Sancerre

Cost: $15/baker’s dozen

900 First St., New Suffolk (more other locations, see website)

Hampton Oyster Co. | Illustration by Kelly Franké

3. HAMPTON OYSTER CO.

Oyster name: Walks

Taste Notes: salty, vibrant, clean

Pair with: Viognier from the Peconic Bay vineyard

Cost: $18/dozen, $25/2 dozen

At Peconic Bay Vineyards, 31320 Main Road, Cutchogue (also at the Farms For the Future farm stand in Southold, 3005 Youngs Ave.)

Cornell Oysters | Illustration by Kelly Franké

4. CORNEL OYSTERS

Oyster name: Cornell’s Peconic Bay Oyster

Taste notes: salty, sweet, creamy

Pair with: Viognier 2020 from Caves Bedell

Cost: $15/dozen

170 Jockey Creek Drive, Southold (also found in East Marion, Laurel and Riverhead)

Founders of Oyster Farm | Illustration by Kelly Franké

5. OYSTER FARM OF THE FOUNDERS

Oyster name: Founders Oysters

Taste Notes: delicious brine with a sweet finish

Pair with: your favorite North Fork sparkling wine

Cost: $15/baker’s dozen

140 Founders Road, Southold

Southold Bay Oysters | Illustration by Kelly Franké

6. SOUTHOLD BAY OYSTERS

Oyster name: Southold Shindigs

Taste Notes: sweet taste with a briny finish

Pair with: Sauvignon Blanc 2020 from Suhru Wines

Cost: $15/baker’s dozen

10273 North Bayview Road, Southold

Yennicott oysters | Illustration by Kelly Franké

seven. YENNICOTT OYSTERS

Oyster name: Yennicott oysters

Taste Notes: salty, salty, sweet

Pair with: McCall Wines 2018 Chardonnay Reserve

Cost: $10/half dozen, $20/dozen

At KK’s Farm, 59945 Main Road, Southold

Small Ram Oysters | Illustration by Kelly Franké

8. LITTLE RAM OYSTER CO.

Oyster name: Small ram oysters

Taste Notes: Tastes like. Holidays

Pair with: Sauvignon Blanc Shared Table

Cost: $30/burlap bag of 25

12710 Soundview Ave, Southold

Peconic pearls | Illustration by Kelly Franké

9. PECONIC PEARLS

Oyster name: peconic pearls

Taste notes: sweet with a delicate brine

Pair with: Paumanok Chenin Blanc Vineyards

Cost: $15/baker’s dozen

At Southold Fish Market, 64755 Main Road, Southold

Widows Own Oyster Farm | Illustration by Kelly Franké

ten. LE TROU DES VEUVES OYSTER FARM

Oyster name: Oyster from the widow’s hole

Taste notes: crispy, clean, salty

Pair with: Parisian tea

Cost: $6/half dozen, $12/dozen

307 Flint Street, Greenport

Shelfish Co. Oyster Ponds | Illustration by Kelly Franké

11. CO.

Oyster name: Selection of oyster ponds

Taste Notes: plump, brackish, mineral finish

Pair with: Miller High Life – The champagne of beers

Cost: $12/dozen

At Latham Farms, 21920 Main Road, Orient

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On ‘Tumbleweed Tuesday’, Northforker staff look back on favorite moments from the summer of 2022 https://robins-island.org/on-tumbleweed-tuesday-northforker-staff-look-back-on-favorite-moments-from-the-summer-of-2022/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 10:08:11 +0000 https://robins-island.org/on-tumbleweed-tuesday-northforker-staff-look-back-on-favorite-moments-from-the-summer-of-2022/ A Greenie Scavenger Hunt (Credit: Michelina Da Fonte) Do you remember the first day of school when your teacher made you get up and told the class what you had been up to over the summer? Well, we didn’t put anyone there, but in the spirit of the end of summer, we asked Northforker staff […]]]>

A Greenie Scavenger Hunt (Credit: Michelina Da Fonte)

Do you remember the first day of school when your teacher made you get up and told the class what you had been up to over the summer?

Well, we didn’t put anyone there, but in the spirit of the end of summer, we asked Northforker staff members to share what they enjoyed in North Fork this summer.

From treasure hunts to nautical adventures, here’s what they had to say!

“I had the opportunity to spend a day on the water learning to sail with Easterly Sailing in Greenport. Yes, it was technically a work assignment, but it certainly wasn’t a bad way to spend a first day of summer under the sun on the glistening Peconic Bay. It was a new experience for me and certainly an unforgettable feeling of peace and tranquility but also adventure and adrenaline. Thanks again to Captain Paul Kreiling and the first Lieutenant James Lockley for inviting me! — Tara Smith, Senior Writer

“I’m new to North Fork so this summer has been all about exploring all it has to offer. My favorite times were those spent with family and friends relaxing at wineries like Jamesport Vineyards, Bridge Lane and Croteaux. I also really appreciate our proximity to the water and have often taken in the views of Peconic Bay with walks on the beach.” —Victoria Caruso, journalist

“One of our favorite things to do in North Fork is going on the Greenie Supply & Tackle Scavenger Hunt. This summer, we brought with us a family who came from outside the region. It was so fun to see not only the kids getting into it, but the adults as well. The map took us to the very end of the North Fork, which gave us some wonderful panoramic views of the water – we were all amazed. Although I consider myself well seasoned when it comes to hunting, this particular edition of the treasure map was difficult and took courage. Our dogged determination, especially on my brother-in-law’s part, paid off as we found the golden loot and declared it “the best adventure”. — Michelina Da Fonte, Associate Director of Content

“My wife Vera and I got married in North Fork ten years ago and try most years to dine at a restaurant in North Fork on our anniversary in July. The years we’re super organized, we go to Brecknock Hall for a photo with the kids on the same steps where we got married (needless to say the kids have gotten older, that’s harder to do!) Since it was No 10 this year, we opted for a special occasion dinner trying something new without the kids, enjoying the food and drink at Southold Social in Southold. Other than that, summer on the North Fork has been spent exploring familiar favorites. One simple evening that stood out was taking the kids and the new pup we adopted from Southold Animal Shelter to Snowflake Ice Cream Shoppe in Riverhead, where they even have dog treats on the menu. — Grant Parpan, Content Director

Credit: Alice Falcone Courtesy Photo

Terra Vite Winery & Vineyard held a fabulous Pride event in June that I was able to attend with my partner and friends, and it was a great afternoon filled with great food, wine and community. It was really great to see other members of the LGBTQ community on North Fork in such a beautiful setting. A light summer rain threatened to put a damper on the festivities, but the sun finally shone, making for a beautiful and memorable day. —Lee Meyer, Journalist

A longtime friend I met in high school – circa 1980s – who now lives out of state was visiting Long Island on a weeknight this summer, so I knew I had to take her to a vineyard after work. I chose Lieb Cellars and it was a hit everywhere. It was just after a light rain and we sat out front on one of the wooden tables. Our view, and what we ordered was delicious. She enjoyed a red, their Estate Teroldego-Lagrein, while I enjoyed a white, their Estate Riesling. We paired it with crackers topped with manchego and fig. A great memory has been created on North Fork. — Christine Kelly-Smimmo, staff artist

My #1 most relaxing evening this year was spent floating on my brother’s boat in the bay near Goose Creek watching the Wednesday night sailing races around Shelter Island. We enjoyed dinner and music on the boat, then caught a beautiful sunset on the way back to the dock! Summer isn’t complete for me without a trip on the water. — Cerria Orientale Torres, Sales Manager

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