New suffolk – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 18:46:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://robins-island.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T005401.436.png New suffolk – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ 32 32 Cornell James Beslin – Chattanoogan.com https://robins-island.org/cornell-james-beslin-chattanoogan-com/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 18:27:53 +0000 https://robins-island.org/cornell-james-beslin-chattanoogan-com/ Cornell James Beslin left this life on September 26, 2022. He was born on March 13, 1952 in New Orleans, the third of five children of Joseph James Beslin II and Charlie Mae Stephens Beslin. Growing up, Cornell was affectionately nicknamed “Butch” and was an avid swimmer. During the summer, Cornell and the rest of […]]]>

Cornell James Beslin left this life on September 26, 2022.

He was born on March 13, 1952 in New Orleans, the third of five children of Joseph James Beslin II and Charlie Mae Stephens Beslin. Growing up, Cornell was affectionately nicknamed “Butch” and was an avid swimmer. During the summer, Cornell and the rest of his siblings worked as lifeguards for the New Orleans Recreation Development (NORD) and the New Orleans Levee Board. Cornell attended Booker T. Washington High School and served as student body council president, and he was the sole representative from New Orleans in the leadership of Camp Rising Sun in New York.

Cornell attended college at Grambling State University and earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. He enlisted in the Navy after taking a break from college life. He completed his first tour as a disbursement clerk on the submarine USS ORION (AS-18) and on Midway Island during his service. During this time, he married his college sweetheart, Maxine. After graduating, he began his career joining Southern Railway, later Norfolk Southern, as a trainee assistant and train master (responsible for safety) in several locations including: Birmingham, AL, Somerset, KY , Selma, AL and ending in Chattanooga. While in Chattanooga, he changed careers and worked as a payroll manager at Erlanger Hospital for 24 years, where he was recognized for his dedication to service and dedication to people.

Service to support and uplift others was in the soul of Cornell. Throughout his life, Cornell held many positions while attending Central Congregational United Church (New Orleans), Warren Chapel AME, and St. James AME (Chattanooga). He was a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Incorporated [Gamma Gamma Undergraduate Chapter & Kappa Iota Graduate Chapter] where he held numerous leadership positions. In addition to his fraternity service, one of his many passions was supporting Tyner High, now Tyner Academy, football and basketball programs. He started the first recall club for the basketball team while creating videos to capture the events. As ‘The Voice of Rams’ footballer, he announced matches for over 20 years and provided excitement and commentary for the ‘Ram Train’.

He leaves to cherish his memory, his wife, Maxine Stubblefield Beslin of 49 years; two sons, Marcus (Betty) of Suffolk, VA, and Christopher (Letitia) of LaVergne, TN; six grandchildren (Kennedy, Sean, Benjamin, Christian, Taylor & Jordan); three sisters, Margie Beslin Shorter (Joseph) of New Orleans, LA, Deidre Beslin of Memphis, TN and Stephani Beslin Black (Paul) of Gulfport, MS; nieces, Natasha and Diana; nephews Joseph (Joan), Gregory, Jermaine, Kemario, Trey and Mathew; loving brother and sister, Anthony Stubblefield (Cathy) of Augusta, GA and Michelle Stubblefield Weatherly of Chicago, IL; special cousins, Joyce Pascal Kilgore (James), Marva Smith and Joseph G. Smith of Washington DC; and a host of close relatives, friends and neighbors.

A visitation will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. on Thursday, October 6 at the John P. Franklin Funeral Home. A memorial service will begin at 11 a.m. on Friday, October 7 in the chapel. Interment will be in Chattanooga National Cemetery.

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Man found guilty of sexually abusing 2 younger sisters https://robins-island.org/man-found-guilty-of-sexually-abusing-2-younger-sisters/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 22:10:40 +0000 https://robins-island.org/man-found-guilty-of-sexually-abusing-2-younger-sisters/ A Long Island man has been convicted of sexually assaulting two young girls. Manuel Cedillo, of Levittown, was found guilty by jury verdict of two counts of violent felony of course sexual conduct against a child on Friday, September 30. The offenses took place in Suffolk County. “No child should have to go through the […]]]>

A Long Island man has been convicted of sexually assaulting two young girls.

Manuel Cedillo, of Levittown, was found guilty by jury verdict of two counts of violent felony of course sexual conduct against a child on Friday, September 30.

The offenses took place in Suffolk County.

“No child should have to go through the trauma of confronting their abuser and reliving such horrific experiences, but these girls did it and I commend them for their bravery,” said Suffolk County District Attorney Raymond A. Tierney. “Because of their bravery, this defendant faces a heavy prison sentence.”

Evidence at trial established that between the spring of 2011 and February 2012, Cedillo, who was known to the family, sexually assaulted the two on separate occasions, Tierney said.

The two victims are sisters and were 8 and 5 years old respectively at the time of the abuse, Tierney said.

Cedillo sexually assaulted the older sister from age 8 until age 9, according to Tierney.

Cedillo also subjected the younger sister to sexual assault during the same period when she was between 5 and 6 years old, Tierney said.

The abuse stopped when Cedillo attempted to sexually abuse the oldest daughter and she partially disclosed to her mother that he had touched her inappropriately, Tierney said.

No further disclosure was made to the victims’ mother until eight years later, when the older sister noticed Cedillo was looking at her Instagram Stories and panicked that he was stalking her, prosecutors said. .

After the older sister fully revealed what Cedillo did to her, the younger sister also revealed the abuse she suffered at the hands of Cedillo, Tierney said.

Cedillo is due back in court for sentencing on Monday, November 21.

Click here to follow Daily Voice Suffolk and receive free updates.

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George Reich, 79, of Bohemia, church deacon, retired NYPD, has died https://robins-island.org/george-reich-79-of-bohemia-church-deacon-retired-nypd-has-died/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://robins-island.org/george-reich-79-of-bohemia-church-deacon-retired-nypd-has-died/ According to his wife Linda’s estimate, George Reich visited approximately 2,500 crime scenes as a ballistics forensic scientist for the NYPD, helping solve murders and other crimes as he closely examined The balls. But he had another life, too, as a churchman. After retiring from the NYPD and the Suffolk County Crime Lab, Reich became […]]]>

According to his wife Linda’s estimate, George Reich visited approximately 2,500 crime scenes as a ballistics forensic scientist for the NYPD, helping solve murders and other crimes as he closely examined The balls.

But he had another life, too, as a churchman. After retiring from the NYPD and the Suffolk County Crime Lab, Reich became an ordained deacon in the Roman Catholic Church on Long Island. For years he worked in the social ministry of Catholic Charity parishes, helping the needy.

Colleagues and relatives said the two lives had a common theme for Reich, a longtime resident of Bohemia who died Saturday at 79: service.

“Service is kind of essential to who we are as a community,” said Reverend Joseph Schlafer, pastor of St. John Nepomucene in Bohemia, where Reich had been a parishioner since 1973. “You can do it as a policeman. , you can do it as a deacon.These are different types of service.

Reich “just lived a wonderful life of what I would call loving, joyful service,” Schlafer said. “He was an example of what it means to live the values ​​of the Gospel. He was an example for all of us. »

His wife, Linda Sherlock-Reich, said: “He was like an angel on earth. So many people talked to him, shared their misfortunes with him. He touched the world.

George Reich was born and raised in the Bronx, attending St. Raymond High School and then Fordham Prep for high school. From there, he would join the NYPD, inspired by an uncle who worked in the ballistics section of the department.

As a detective and a member of the team himself, Reich would go to filming scenes and morgues, checking bodies, bullets and guns, and microscopically examining them to link them – or not. – connect them, said his wife, who was herself a medical examiner at the Suffolk County Crime Lab, where they met.

Reich became highly respected both in the NYPD, where he spent two decades, and later in the Suffolk lab.

“He was a consummate professional,” said Suffolk County District Attorney Ray Tierney, who served as an assistant district attorney in the 1990s when he worked with Reich. “He was a great guy. An excellent medical examiner.”

Reich was often called to testify at trials, Tierney said.

“George was the guy you relied on because he really looked after you and he really had tremendous expertise.”

In the late 1990s, Reich was brought to reexamine the 1968 assassination of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., in part at the behest of the civil rights icon’s family, according to Tierney and Reich’s wife .

Questions have been raised as to who killed King, with allegations surfacing that “suggest that persons other than or in addition to James Earl Ray participated in the assassination”, according to the US Department of Health’s website. Justice.

Reich was one of three ballistics experts who traveled to a Rhode Island lab to conduct tests and examinations of the bullet and gun that killed King, his wife said. The investigation did not yield any new findings about King’s murder.

Around the same time, Reich was devoting himself full-time to his other passion: religious work.

He and his wife trained at the Diocese of Rockville Center Pastoral Training Institute, which prepared lay people to work in parishes.

He took full-time employment with Catholic Charities, helping run their social ministry programs.

“His heart and passion were more about people than guns and crime,” his wife said.

Still, there was a connection to his police work, she said, because he saw church work in part as a way to keep people out of bad situations.

“What can we do to help people before they get to the point where they commit a crime,” was a theme that drove her husband, Linda Sherlock-Reich said.

“I know people in need get to the point where they become criminals in our eyes,” she said, “but often they work for survival and they do something because they’re trying to to survive.”

Laura A. Cassell, CEO of Catholic Charities of Long Island, said after Reich retired from the social ministry team, he remained active with the organization as a longtime chaplain. .

Reich “held a very special place in the hearts of the families we helped after 9/11, as well as those devastated by Super Hurricane Sandy,” Cassell said. “He helped build a better, kinder Long Island and brought comfort and healing to everyone he met.”

Besides his wife, Reich is survived by his sons Brad, of Lindenhurst, Brian, of Patchogue, Christopher, of Wantagh and Frank, of Pennsylvania.

A wake will be held Wednesday from noon to 4 p.m. at the Raynor & D’Andrea Funeral Home in Bayport. A transfer mass will be held Wednesday at 8 p.m. at Saint-Jean Népomucène, with a funeral mass at noon Thursday.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. John’s Parish Outreach, 1140 Locust Ave, Bohemia, New York, 11716, or Catholic Charities CARES Program, 90 Cherry Lane, Hicksville, New York 11801.

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Brewing battle in Nassau over redistricting pace https://robins-island.org/brewing-battle-in-nassau-over-redistricting-pace/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 20:15:11 +0000 https://robins-island.org/brewing-battle-in-nassau-over-redistricting-pace/ Republicans and Democrats in the Nassau County Legislature are vying for the pace of the once-a-decade redistricting of the 19-member county legislature, as the process lags far behind the pace in Suffolk County and New York. In Suffolk, two maps offered — one driven by majority Republicans, the other by Democrats – of the county’s […]]]>

Republicans and Democrats in the Nassau County Legislature are vying for the pace of the once-a-decade redistricting of the 19-member county legislature, as the process lags far behind the pace in Suffolk County and New York.

In Suffolk, two maps offeredone driven by majority Republicans, the other by Democrats – of the county’s 18 legislature districts have been on the table since August, after a lawsuit stopped Democrats from passing a map they unilaterally created before losing control of the legislature last November.

The New York City Redistricting Commission submitted a new boundary map of the City Council’s 51 districts to the council in July, and the draft is under review.

Once the commission adopts a revised map, neither the council nor Mayor Eric Adams can change it.

Majority Legislative Republicans in Nassau are resisting pressure from Democratic lawmakers to amend the county charter to push back deadlines for creating new maps.

Nassau’s 11-member Temporary District Advisory Board has held three public hearings since Aug. 31, with six more scheduled, the next on Sept. 28 in Long Beach. There is no deadline to complete the hearing process.

Democrats in the Legislature and Committee say final maps must be in place by February to meet candidate nomination deadlines for the new June primary schedule.

Prior to 2020, primaries were held in September, but the March deadline for new legislative cards has not changed.

Dave L. Mejias, head of the Democratic delegation to the Nassau redistricting committee, decried the pace of the hearings, saying he won’t allow enough time for more public hearings after the commission drafts the proposed maps.

“This should have happened months ago,” Mejias, a lawyer and former Nassau County Democratic lawmaker, told Newsday.

“Starting so late has limited public participation, which could affect voter confidence in the process,” he said.

GOP leaders express confidence that the public will have ample time to review, compare, and comment on the commission’s draft map and that an amendment to the county charter is not required.

Republican-appointed commissioner Peter A. Bee, a Mineola attorney, says he “shares the Democrats’ stated vision of working together.”

But Bee called it “premature and unnecessary to set arbitrary deadlines for map availability”.

Commission Chairman Frank Moroney, a lawyer and senior adviser to the GOP legislative majority, told Newsday that more hearings after the panel drafts its maps would delay the redistricting process.

The fight opens a window into Nassau’s version of arguably the most partisan activity in government — the legislative redistricting that is necessary for local and state legislatures, and Congress, after every decennial U.S. census.

Nassau’s redistricting committee has five members appointed by Speaker of the Legislature Richard Nicolello (R-New Hyde Park), five by Minority Leader Kevan Abrahams (D-Freeport) and a non-voting chairman appointed by County Executive Republican Bruce Blakeman.

Their goal is to create 19 new legislative districts, each with about 73,500 people, and draft a map for the county legislature to adopt, the commissioners said.

Nassau County allocated $985,000 to the district commission for mapping technology and to pay for experts, legal fees and other expenses.

Moroney said the panel posts some 500 notices in government buildings, on social media and to local media before each meeting, with public hearings scheduled in every city and town in Nassau.

Sixty-two people have spoken publicly at meetings held so far, according to the Nassau County Clerk’s Office.

Moroney told Newsday that the process was “open, transparent and encouraged public participation. We have repeatedly informed people of the steps of the process and that we intend to follow federal laws to the letter and states”.

The public will have ample time to view the map and make recommendations once the commission creates a draft, Moroney said, and copies will be publicly available, including at all 57 county public libraries.

“We really want information from people,” he said.

Still, Democrats say Republicans truncated the time between public release of draft maps and final adoption of new district lines, limiting public input and allowing less time to challenge the new map before it was approved by the entire county legislature.

“It doesn’t matter which party is in power, redistricting is a highly partisan process and each side is looking to get the most benefit possible because it only happens every 10 years,” said Lawrence Levy, executive dean of the National Center. for Suburban Studies. at Hofstra University, Newsday said.

“Now is the time for everyone who cares about who represents them, what communities they will join and other issues to speak up, because they won’t have a chance for another 10 years,” Levy said.

The commission’s map proposal must pass the rules committee of the county legislature and then the full legislature.

County lawmakers can accept, reject, or modify maps submitted by the redistricting commission.

The legislature, with a 12-7 majority in the GOP, can also decide to draw and pass its own redistricting map.

Under the county charter, the county must adopt the final district lines by March 7.

“Because we are planning a gerrymandered card, there will undoubtedly be some litigation,” Mejias said.

“However, the courts may not hear the case if it causes chaos in an election cycle, so if the cards are approved late enough in the game, it would be difficult, if not impossible, for communities to sue for protest the cards,” Mejias said. .

Mary Studdert, spokeswoman for the majority Republican lawmakers, said in a statement, “The county charter states that the deadline for submitting maps to the legislature is ‘no later than January 9, 2023.’ Nothing prevents the [redistricting commission] and the legislature to act sooner to accommodate the current circulation schedule [candidate nominating] petitions. The charter does not need to be changed to do this.”

William Biamonte, chief of staff for the minority Democrats, called the GOP’s resistance to changing the county’s charter “the latest example of how the integrity and success of the redistricting process continues to be undermined by a lack of transparency and cooperation”.

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Massachusetts reports 9,091 new cases of COVID-19 this week – NBC Boston https://robins-island.org/massachusetts-reports-9091-new-cases-of-covid-19-this-week-nbc-boston/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 22:02:18 +0000 https://robins-island.org/massachusetts-reports-9091-new-cases-of-covid-19-this-week-nbc-boston/ Massachusetts health officials reported 9,091 new cases of COVID-19 and 45 new deaths last week, with new data released Thursday. In total, there have been 1,869,603 cases and 20,251 deaths since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. The state reported 194 people primarily hospitalized with COVID-19 and a total of 590 hospitalized patients with the […]]]>

Massachusetts health officials reported 9,091 new cases of COVID-19 and 45 new deaths last week, with new data released Thursday.

In total, there have been 1,869,603 cases and 20,251 deaths since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

The state reported 194 people primarily hospitalized with COVID-19 and a total of 590 hospitalized patients with the virus. Of the total hospitalizations, 50 were in intensive care and 11 were intubated.

Massachusetts’ COVID cases, tracked on the Public Health Department’s interactive coronavirus dashboard, are up from the previous week. As Thursday marks the official start of autumn, doctors are warning that they expect to see the number of cases rise again. They always encourage people to get vaccinated to protect against the virus.

Suffolk, Middlesex, Worcester, Franklin, Norfolk, Plymouth, Barnstable and Dukes counties are listed at medium risk for transmission of the virus, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The rest of the state remains at low risk.

The state’s seven-day average positivity was listed at 7.48% on Thursday, down from 7.32% last week.

This springtime bump was well below the types of case counts and hospitalizations seen at the height of the omicron surge in January, when the average daily case count reached more than 28,000 and hospitalizations peaked at around 3,300.

COVID levels in sewage, as reported by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority’s tracking system, show relatively stable numbers in the Boston area.

Experts said reports on the number of cases had become a less accurate indicator during the omicron surge, given difficulties in getting tested. Today, the widespread use of rapid tests means that some results go unreported.

More than 15 million doses of vaccine have now been administered in Massachusetts.

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Notice to voters sent out this week on district changes after census – The Suffolk News-Herald https://robins-island.org/notice-to-voters-sent-out-this-week-on-district-changes-after-census-the-suffolk-news-herald/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:22:30 +0000 https://robins-island.org/notice-to-voters-sent-out-this-week-on-district-changes-after-census-the-suffolk-news-herald/ Notice to voters sent this week on district changes after census Posted at 6:20 p.m. on Tuesday, September 20, 2022 Voters in Virginia will receive notices by mail regarding their polling places for the Nov. 8 general election starting this week. Elections Department Commissioner Susan Beals said the information was being mailed because districts and […]]]>

Notice to voters sent this week on district changes after census

Posted at 6:20 p.m. on Tuesday, September 20, 2022

Voters in Virginia will receive notices by mail regarding their polling places for the Nov. 8 general election starting this week.

Elections Department Commissioner Susan Beals said the information was being mailed because districts and polling places had changed for some voters as part of the redistricting process after the 2020 census.

“We encourage every voter to verify their voting location on their voter notice,” Beals said.

District boundaries for federal, state, and local offices are redrawn every 10 years after the census. The 2022 election is the first general election in November where the constituency change resulting from the 2020 census takes effect. All registered voters in Virginia will receive a notification with their district and voting location information, whether or not changes have been made.

Separate polling stations for municipal elections will not be listed as municipal elections have been moved from May to November and take place on 8 November.

Virginia maintained all of its 11 congressional districts after the 2020 U.S. Census, although many borders were changed due to demographic changes. The Supreme Court of Virginia unanimously approved the new district boundaries on Dec. 28, 2021, after considering a proposal from two court-appointed special masters after Virginia’s new bipartisan Redistricting Commission was not in able to reach an agreement on the new boundaries.

Voters can also find information about their district and polling location on the Virginia Department of Elections at bit.ly/3UooFyI.

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Opposing Port 460 logistics center planned for Suffolk – The Virginian-Pilot https://robins-island.org/opposing-port-460-logistics-center-planned-for-suffolk-the-virginian-pilot/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 22:00:14 +0000 https://robins-island.org/opposing-port-460-logistics-center-planned-for-suffolk-the-virginian-pilot/ Suffolk City Council plans to vote on the Port 460 logistics center project soon. Thousands of opposing citizens have strongly denounced the project’s many unresolved traffic, safety, cost, environmental and quality of life issues. , most of which stem from the massive influx of tractor-trailers it will add to the already overloaded US 460 and […]]]>

Suffolk City Council plans to vote on the Port 460 logistics center project soon. Thousands of opposing citizens have strongly denounced the project’s many unresolved traffic, safety, cost, environmental and quality of life issues. , most of which stem from the massive influx of tractor-trailers it will add to the already overloaded US 460 and 58. Public opposition to port 460 is huge, but surprisingly some board members seem ready to endorse it.

Lately, I’ve come to see that the biggest problem with Port 460 isn’t the trucks, or the truckers, or the developers who would bring them here. These are the city and state authorities who are willing, if not eager, to cram many more trucks onto roads that are simply not designed to handle them, and may never be. Tragedy will surely ensue. And why? For a few extra bucks to a city that recently proclaimed itself so fiscally sound it can afford to lower its property tax rate.

Suffolk has already contributed more than its fair share to meet regional warehouse demand, but Port 460 is a bridge too far. If the board doesn’t draw the line here, will it ever? If council approves port 460 despite unprecedented opposition from citizens, so much the worse for ‘It’s a beautiful day to be in Suffolk.’ Get ready to swear allegiance to the new motto – “Everything for a Dollar”.

Mike Host, Suffolk

Re “Words as Weapons” (Your Views, Sept. 13): Daniel Snyder’s letter falsely accused President Joe Biden of making false accusations – “slandering someone without proof” – against “all Trump supporters” in Biden’s September 1 speech at Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

In fact, he only blamed “MAGA Republicans”, carefully pointing out “not all Republicans embrace their extreme ideology”. And he based his criticism on clear facts and not on slander.

He accused Republicans in MAGA “of refusing to accept the results of a free election”. They deny that simple fact, of course, claiming that the 2020 presidential election was somehow rigged. But they only offer theories, with no real proof, as Republican Speaker of the Arizona House of Representatives Rusty Bowers said in congressional testimony, with mild disdain.

Perspectives

Weekly

The best opinion content of the week and the opportunity to participate in a weekly question on a subject that affects our region.

The president also accused Republicans in MAGA of working “state after state to give election-deciding power in America to supporters and cronies.” Made clear.

He accused of seeing “the crowd that stormed the United States Capitol on January 6 – brutally attacking law enforcement – not as insurgents” but as “patriots”. Made clear.

MAGA Republicans could turn all of this around simply by admitting the historical monstrosity of their “big lie” and all that goes with it.

Steven T. Corneliussen, Poquoson

In the 2020 US presidential election, 13 states were identified as “battleground” states. By definition, these are states that can win or lose an election for candidates; for all intents and purposes, the other 37 are “prearranged”. Five of the 13 were won by former President Donald Trump: Florida, Iowa, North Carolina, Ohio and Texas. Eight were won by President Joe Biden: Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Although the procedure and timing of voting varies in each state, many employ the following: absentee ballots, early voting, overseas voting, military voting, and polling stations on Election Day. Voting can be done either electronically or by ballot. The ballots are then counted manually, mechanically or electronically. If all states employed these counting methods, charges of fraud, etc. brought against one, two, three, four or five States not be valid for the 13 or the 50 States?

John Calver, Newport News

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Whitley joins Electric Co-op as Administrative Services Co-ordinator – The Suffolk News-Herald https://robins-island.org/whitley-joins-electric-co-op-as-administrative-services-co-ordinator-the-suffolk-news-herald/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 22:19:08 +0000 https://robins-island.org/whitley-joins-electric-co-op-as-administrative-services-co-ordinator-the-suffolk-news-herald/ Whitley joins the Electric Co-op as Administrative Services Coordinator Posted 6:16 p.m. on Friday, September 16, 2022 Whitley Lucy Whitley joins Community Electric Cooperative as Administrative Services Coordinator this week. Whitley brings to this new position extensive experience in customer service and leadership roles, including approximately 18 months as a branch manager for Farmers Bank […]]]>

Whitley joins the Electric Co-op as Administrative Services Coordinator

Posted 6:16 p.m. on Friday, September 16, 2022

Lucy Whitley joins Community Electric Cooperative as Administrative Services Coordinator this week.

Whitley brings to this new position extensive experience in customer service and leadership roles, including approximately 18 months as a branch manager for Farmers Bank in Windsor.

Originally from Southern California, she has lived in Virginia for 12 years. Prior to working at Farmers Bank for 3½ years, Whitley held customer service positions in government and at a local credit union. She is fluent in Spanish.

“I am thrilled to have Lucy join our team,” said CEC President and CEO Steven Harmon. “She has experience and capabilities that are critical to Community Electric’s mission. We know it will improve the interactions and experiences our members have with us.

Whitley said she often “heard good things” about Community Electric from co-op employees and others who did business at the bank.

“It’s a fresh start for me and a chance to learn more about the members through the CEC,” she said. “I could tell they had a great vibe, and I’m looking forward to being a part of the company and building my career and my friendships.”

Whitley’s first day at the CEC is Monday, September 19.

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Monkeypox virus declines on LI and nationwide, experts say https://robins-island.org/monkeypox-virus-declines-on-li-and-nationwide-experts-say/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 21:22:54 +0000 https://robins-island.org/monkeypox-virus-declines-on-li-and-nationwide-experts-say/ The monkeypox outbreak, which rocked communities over the summer and created a new public health crisis in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, is beginning to decline locally and nationally amid a campaign immunization and education, medical officials said last week. While Long Island continues to account for the largest percentage of monkeypox cases in […]]]>

The monkeypox outbreak, which rocked communities over the summer and created a new public health crisis in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, is beginning to decline locally and nationally amid a campaign immunization and education, medical officials said last week.

While Long Island continues to account for the largest percentage of monkeypox cases in the state, outside of New York, the trends appear to be pointing in the right direction, health officials said.

Statewide cases have fallen since Aug. 25 after peaking in early July, according to state Health Department data.

Nassau County and Suffolk County health officials have also reported a drop in the number of new cases in recent weeks – mirroring a trend in New York, the epicenter of the crisis.

“The monkeypox epidemic has not gone away,” said Dr. Bruce Farber, chief of public health and epidemiology for Northwell Health. “But I think it’s going down. The numbers have been falling nationally and locally over the past few weeks. And the trend seems to be real. So clearly I think things are improving.”

Monkeypox is a rare but highly contagious viral infection that is spread through intimate contact, often skin to skin. While anyone can catch monkeypox, the overwhelming percentage of those who have contracted the virus in the current outbreak are men who have sex with men, experts have said.

Since the outbreak began in early summer, Suffolk has reported 64 cases of monkeypox – second among suburban counties behind Westchester with 84 – while Nassau has reported another 49 cases, according to Department of Health data. state of health. Together, Long Island accounts for more than 39% of all cases in the state outside of the city, the data shows.

“The increase in cases has slowed significantly, as has demand for the monkeypox vaccine, indicating that community members are heeding public health warnings and taking appropriate action to protect themselves from the virus,” said said Dr Gregson Pigott, Suffolk’s Health Commissioner.

New York City has reported 3,339 total cases, about 1,000 fewer than the state of California as a whole, but those numbers have dropped since late July, the data shows.

On July 25, the city reported 95 new monkeypox cases for the day. But so far in September, there hasn’t been a day the city has recorded more than 20 new cases as the seven-day average has fallen since August 1, according to the New York Department of Health. .

Nationwide, where nearly 22,000 cases have been reported, monkeypox incidents have been declining since late August, but not at the same rate as in New York state, according to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. .

Dr Sharon Nachman, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, said a high profile public education campaign was targeting men who have sex with multiple or anonymous male sex partners, as well as increased access to monkeypox vaccine and testing. , likely contributed to the decline.

But she said it was too early to declare victory.

“The number of new cases has gone down,” Nachman said. “But, like others, I share concerns about this little snapshot of time because we recently had a holiday weekend and are concerned about incubation time, so we are not out of the woods yet. We will clearly need to track new cases over the next few weeks.”

As of Friday, the Nassau Department of Health had received 3,560 vials of monkeypox vaccine and administered 2,840 doses, according to county spokesman Chris Boyle. Suffolk received 9,220 vials and administered 7,402 doses in total, county spokeswoman Marykate Guilfoyle said.

In recent weeks, vaccination centers have begun administering divided doses of the rare monkeypox vaccine intradermally or by injection into the skin, rather than subcutaneously under the skin, officials said. Splitting is usually done by dividing each dose into five parts, resulting in five times the intake.

LGBT Network President David Kilmnick said his Hauppauge-based organization has conducted ongoing outreach in person and via social media, providing advice on treating monkeypox and ways to reduce its spread.

“The ultimate goal should be to get ahead and we can’t slow down our efforts,” he said. “Increasingly it feels like a marathon, not a sprint in the need to do the hard and sustained work to stop the spread of monkeypox.”

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Petty scammer charged with sexually assaulting blind, homeless woman 3 times in April https://robins-island.org/petty-scammer-charged-with-sexually-assaulting-blind-homeless-woman-3-times-in-april/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 20:58:59 +0000 https://robins-island.org/petty-scammer-charged-with-sexually-assaulting-blind-homeless-woman-3-times-in-april/ A man with a history of assault and burglary has been charged with repeatedly sexually assaulting a blind woman at a South End healthcare facility for the homeless. Joaquim Fortes, 51, was arraigned in Boston City Court late last month on three counts of indecent assault and assault on a person over the age of […]]]>

A man with a history of assault and burglary has been charged with repeatedly sexually assaulting a blind woman at a South End healthcare facility for the homeless.

Joaquim Fortes, 51, was arraigned in Boston City Court late last month on three counts of indecent assault and assault on a person over the age of 14. Judge James Coffey set $5,000 bail and ordered Fortes to stay away from the victim and the Barbara McInnis home, the Albany Street health facility where he is accused of assaulting the victim.

“This victim deserves tremendous credit for cooperating with police and helping them gather enough information to arrest the person responsible for these assaults,” Suffolk District Attorney Kevin Hayden said in a statement Friday. .

According to the DA’s office, Fortes — whom they list as being from Boston but who has been listed as from other locations in previous arrests, including New Bedford — on April 1 entered the victim’s bedroom. three times and placed his private part in the victim’s bedroom. hand.

The victim, who is not only legally blind but also suffers from multiple sclerosis, told authorities that she was confused due to being dizzy in the first two alleged assaults, but had regained her faculties in the third instance and chased Fortes out of his room.

Prosecutors say police obtained surveillance footage that shows Fortes entering and leaving the woman’s bedroom three times.

The Barbara McInnis Home provides respite medical care – which is short-term medical and recovery services – “for homeless people who are far too sick to live in shelters but not sick enough to occupy a hospital bed. expensive acute care”.

Later in the same month as the alleged assaults, Fortes was arrested by Dartmouth police on suspicion of breaking into a car on Walsh Street on April 13.

In 2009, Fortes was arrested after Fairhaven police said he stole a car and led them in a westbound chase on Route 6 to cross a barrier on the New Bedford-Fairhaven Bridge, then jump into water to avoid them. He had apparently headed the same department in a prosecution six years earlier as well.

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