New suffolk – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:37:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://robins-island.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T005401.436.png New suffolk – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ 32 32 Ipswich, Suffolk has the highest Covid rate in England https://robins-island.org/ipswich-suffolk-has-the-highest-covid-rate-in-england/ https://robins-island.org/ipswich-suffolk-has-the-highest-covid-rate-in-england/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:01:00 +0000 https://robins-island.org/ipswich-suffolk-has-the-highest-covid-rate-in-england/ The Covid infection rate in Ipswich jumped last week to become the highest in England. Government data revealed that the seven-day rate is now 854.5 cases per 100,000 people for the week through October 14. This means that nearly one in a hundred people living in the borough tested positive for the coronavirus within a […]]]>

The Covid infection rate in Ipswich jumped last week to become the highest in England.

Government data revealed that the seven-day rate is now 854.5 cases per 100,000 people for the week through October 14.

This means that nearly one in a hundred people living in the borough tested positive for the coronavirus within a week, with 1,162 new infections.

The city with the second highest Covid rate in the country is Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, which has 817.9 100,000 cases, with 655 new cases reported.

Babergh, East Suffolk, Mid Suffolk and West Suffolk have also seen an increase in the infection rate over the past week and are now above the UK average of 437.6 cases per 100,000 people.


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Despite the recent increase in cases, the number of people hospitalized with the virus in Suffolk remains well below the January peak.

East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust, which also runs Colchester Hospital, had 39 Covid patients as of October 12.

But the trust was treating more than 500 patients at the height of the pandemic in January.

Calls have been made to open vaccination centers for children, as only 14.1% of the county’s youth have been vaccinated.


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Celebrating Gabby Petito in Patchogue – a foundation to help others on her behalf https://robins-island.org/celebrating-gabby-petito-in-patchogue-a-foundation-to-help-others-on-her-behalf/ https://robins-island.org/celebrating-gabby-petito-in-patchogue-a-foundation-to-help-others-on-her-behalf/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 21:28:58 +0000 https://robins-island.org/celebrating-gabby-petito-in-patchogue-a-foundation-to-help-others-on-her-behalf/ A lively group of more than 100 ate, drank and danced at a Patchogue music hall on Sunday with Gabby Petito leading the way and raised money for a new foundation in his name. The Gabby Petito Foundation, which is being set up by the family of the Blue Point native, will benefit searches for […]]]>

A lively group of more than 100 ate, drank and danced at a Patchogue music hall on Sunday with Gabby Petito leading the way and raised money for a new foundation in his name.

The Gabby Petito Foundation, which is being set up by the family of the Blue Point native, will benefit searches for other missing persons and support women in abusive relationships, the family’s lawyer said, Rick Stafford.

“It took a tragic situation and we’re trying to shed a good light on it,” Stafford said. “Gabby was a great and wonderful woman. She made everyone smile and we are trying to help other women who are in her situation.”

Participants paid $ 20 each to participate in the fundraiser at 89 North Music Venue on Ocean Avenue. The organizers did not provide an estimate of the amount of money raised by the gate as well as raffles and other sales.

Petito’s parents, who were in Wyoming this weekend to collect his ashes, were not spotted at the event.

She and her fiance Brian Laundrie – graduates of Bayport-Blue Point High School – were traveling across the country this summer which they have documented extensively on social media.

Petito’s mother, Nicole Schmidt, of Blue Point, reported her disappearance to Suffolk County Police on September 11 following news of her in late August.

Laundrie has been named as a person of interest by the FBI, but has eluded police since his family said he was missing on September 13.

Petito’s body was found on September 19 in a Wyoming national forest. A Wyoming coroner determined that she died of manual strangulation several weeks before her discovery.

His story spread nationally and globally as police video showing Petito and Laundrie speaking with officers in Utah after an apparent argument raised more questions. The continued effort to find the answers was on the minds of many who were otherwise in an upbeat mood on the site.

“It brings everyone together,” said Mark Opisso of Mount Sinai, a Brookhaven National Laboratory police officer who said he worked with Gabby’s stepfather Jim Schmidt. “No one knew Gabby and now the whole world knows her.”

John Drews of Sound Beach, a family friend, said he had 700 silicone and metal bracelets made with the words “Justice for Gabby” made. He said 600 of the $ 10 and $ 20 bracelets have already been sold with the proceeds going to the foundation.

“As a father with a daughter of the same age, it really touches me,” Drews said. “And I think we all want the same thing. Justice for Gabby.”

She didn’t know Petito, but Katie Boodram of Oakdale felt the need to attend the fundraiser in his honor and also show her support for women who have been in abusive relationships.

“I think it’s beautiful that all of Long Island, especially Blue Point, Patchogue, can all come together in Gabby’s honor,” she said.


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Democrat Tim Sini and Republican Ray Tierney fight over who’s toughest on crime in Suffolk https://robins-island.org/democrat-tim-sini-and-republican-ray-tierney-fight-over-whos-toughest-on-crime-in-suffolk/ https://robins-island.org/democrat-tim-sini-and-republican-ray-tierney-fight-over-whos-toughest-on-crime-in-suffolk/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 09:28:57 +0000 https://robins-island.org/democrat-tim-sini-and-republican-ray-tierney-fight-over-whos-toughest-on-crime-in-suffolk/ In the race for the Suffolk County District Attorney, the question of who will be tougher on crime – Democrat Tim Sini or Ray Tierney, the Republican and Conservative Party candidate – has arisen as the main issue. Sini, the incumbent, is seeking election for a second term against Tierney, a former Suffolk County and […]]]>

In the race for the Suffolk County District Attorney, the question of who will be tougher on crime – Democrat Tim Sini or Ray Tierney, the Republican and Conservative Party candidate – has arisen as the main issue.

Sini, the incumbent, is seeking election for a second term against Tierney, a former Suffolk County and Federal Prosecutor.

Sini, 41, from Babylon, says he has targeted MS-13 gang violence, environmental crimes, drug trafficking and political corruption since taking office in 2018.

Sini, a former federal prosecutor, has held frequent press conferences extolling the arrests and cases his office pursues throughout his tenure.

“We have been keeping Suffolk safe for the past six years and will continue to fight for residents to keep Suffolk as safe as possible, and will continue to decimate gangs like the MS-13,” Sini told Newsday, se referring to his service as police commissioner and district attorney.

Tierney, 55, of Holtsville, points to his experience as the former Assistant United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York and as a former Suffolk County District Attorney.

Tierney, chief compliance and enforcement attorney at Suffolk County Off-Tracking Betting Corp., said as a district attorney he would indict more indictments in criminal cases, re-establish a unit of dedicated gang, would reinstall ShotSpotter technology in the county, and lobby the state legislature to overturn bail reform laws.

During the campaign, Tierney held regular press conferences in which he highlighted what he said were Sini’s failures to aggressively prosecute defendants who allegedly committed more serious crimes while on bail or on bail. court.

“I do not present myself as harsher on crime,” Tierney, who is not registered with any political party, told Newsday. “I am more severe with the crime.”

It’s not uncommon for district attorney races to focus on which candidate will fight crime most effectively, said political consultant Michael Dawidziak, who has worked primarily for Republicans.

“’I am the person who will keep your neighborhoods safe, keep criminals off the streets,” Dawidziak said of typical campaign messages.

But district attorney campaigns are having a turn this year in Long Island and other areas of the state, Dawidziak said.

Republicans are attacking Democrats for bail reform laws that the Democratic-controlled state legislature passed in 2019.

The reform package eliminated cash bail for most misdemeanors and non-violent charges, so defendants won’t have to wait in jail before trial if they can’t afford to post bail.

Opponents of the law, including many district attorneys, have warned that it could allow defendants to commit crimes outside of prison.

Supporters of the law say recidivism is rare and argue that detaining people on the basis of their ability to post bail discriminates against low-income defendants and pushes them to agree to plea negotiations.

Dawidziak said polls showed bail reform was unpopular in suburban areas such as Nassau and Suffolk counties.

“I haven’t seen anything so unpopular in a long time,” Dawidziak said.

Sini and Tierney say they oppose bail reform law.

Sini was a federal prosecutor for over four years.

He has filed a lawsuit against the former national leader of the Trinitarios gang, a Bronx drug smuggling group and a murder conspiracy, according to the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York.

Sini, a graduate of American University in Washington, DC and Brooklyn Law School, worked for about a year as the Suffolk County Deputy Director for Public Safety under County Director Steve Bellone, who has him appointed county police commissioner.

Sini was commissioner for 18 months. He was elected Suffolk County District Attorney in November 2017.

Sini, who was recently elected president of the association of state prosecutors, said if re-elected he would continue to invest in new technology and “make the office a national model.”

Tierney, a graduate of Brown University and St. John’s University Law School in Queens, began his career in the Suffolk County Attorney’s Office.

For 14 years in the office, Tierney pursued two men accused of the near-fatal beating of Shane Daniels outside a Westhampton Beach nightclub in 1996, as well as cases of rape, domestic violence and child pornography.

Tierney joined the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District in 2008. He has pursued cases against the MS-13 gang and political corruption cases against former Nassau County leader Ed Mangano , former Oyster Bay Town Supervisor John Venditto and former Suffolk Conservative Party Leader Edward Walsh. .

In 2019, Tierney joined the Kings County District Attorney’s Office, where he oversaw units focused on violent criminal enterprises, crime strategies and police-worn cameras.

He served there for about a year, before moving to Suffolk OTB.

As a challenger in the DA race, Tierney focused on Sini’s case as a district attorney, arguing that the incumbent is “gentle on crime”.

Tierney’s main argument is that Sini’s office has not charged enough suspects, including in dozens of cases of illegal gun possession.

Tierney says he would charge in all possible gun possession cases.

Tierney has held weekly press conferences focusing on issues such as a spate of fentanyl overdoses in the East End in August, a murder in April in the Bay Shore and a shooting there in September.

Of the suspects in those cases, three had been released on bail or released on court order for previous arrests for crimes such as illegal possession of firearms and assault, court records show.

Tierney says Sini’s office should have charged the suspects immediately after their first offenses, or on more serious charges.

If this had happened, the judges who treated them as accused after subsequent arrests might have taken the cases more seriously and would have been more likely to have set a higher bond or dismissed the accused in prison, according to Tierney.

“They presented a clear and present danger to the community,” Tierney said of the defendants. “You get this fellow off the street as soon as possible.”

Sini has defended his performance in all of the cases cited by Tierney, and said his office has fought to secure higher bail or to return defendants to jail when the law permits.

“There is literally not a single thing in this procedural story that can even be said from a distance that was treated other than appropriately by my office,” Sini told Newsday.

The three cases Tierney focused on in his press conferences on the indictment issue involve black defendants

Jason Williamson, executive director of the Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law at New York University, said campaign stories such as Tierney’s play on “Existing Fears and Stereotypes” about black men.

Tierney responded that by raising the question of whether Sini was pursuing aggressively enough, he was speaking on behalf of victims of crime in the county, which include people of color.

Lawyers for some of the defendants say Tierney is accusing their clients of serious past crimes for which they were not convicted, when they deserve the presumption of innocence.

Sini said his prosecutors used their discretion to seek charges in an appropriate manner.

When an indictment was not filed immediately for previous criminal allegations, prosecutors negotiated plea deals with defense attorneys, gathered more evidence for a wider investigation, or attempted to protect witnesses or victims who did not want to be identified in court, Sini said.

“Any prosecutor knows there are circumstances where you don’t charge,” Sini said. “But let’s be clear, we have indicted thousands of cases.”

In New York, indictments handed over by grand juries in secret proceedings represent the main avenue for prosecuting crimes, legal experts have said.

Yet indictments are only pronounced in a relatively small percentage of cases, according to data from the state’s Courts Administration Office.

With 101,369 adult felony arrests statewide in 2020, there were 12,394 felony charges, according to the data.

In Suffolk County, there were 3,560 felony arrests last year and 438 felony charges.

In Nassau, the rate was higher in 2020: 4,607 felony arrests and 971 indictments.

Hofstra University criminal law professor Alafair Burke said it was unusual for defendants to be arrested for crimes pending resolution of previous charges.

In New York City, for example, 14% of those released on bail on felony charges were re-arrested on other charges in 2020, according to the New York Police Department website. Such statistics are not available for the counties of Nassau and Suffolk.

Burke, a former Portland, OR attorney and novelist, said the only way to ensure the defendants do not reoffend while on bail would be to send them all back pending trial, which is not ” neither practical nor fair “.

Nonetheless, said Burke, “it’s every prosecutor’s nightmare – you don’t charge a case for some reason and then something bad happens.”


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COVID-19 infections in schools in LI increased 68% in past two and a half weeks, data shows https://robins-island.org/covid-19-infections-in-schools-in-li-increased-68-in-past-two-and-a-half-weeks-data-shows/ https://robins-island.org/covid-19-infections-in-schools-in-li-increased-68-in-past-two-and-a-half-weeks-data-shows/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 21:19:28 +0000 https://robins-island.org/covid-19-infections-in-schools-in-li-increased-68-in-past-two-and-a-half-weeks-data-shows/ Most public schools on Long Island are scrambling to keep parents informed of COVID-19 infections at a time when the cumulative number of cases has jumped by more than 60% in recent weeks, according to the latest state figures. A total of 6,577 school-aged residents in Nassau and Suffolk counties had tested positive for the […]]]>

Most public schools on Long Island are scrambling to keep parents informed of COVID-19 infections at a time when the cumulative number of cases has jumped by more than 60% in recent weeks, according to the latest state figures.

A total of 6,577 school-aged residents in Nassau and Suffolk counties had tested positive for the virus on Thursday, according to the latest lab reports compiled by the state Department of Health. Those cumulative numbers have increased by 68% in the past two and a half weeks or so, from the 3,923 residents aged 5 to 17 reported infected between September 1 and September 27.

National and local authorities have indicated in recent weeks that infection rates remain manageable in an area with a school population exceeding 400,000 students. In a message sent to Newsday on Wednesday, state health officials said the island continues to experience a decline in the incidence of COVID-19, with a seven-day average positive test rate of 4, 1%, against 4.3% a month before the school opened.

“We have seen some stabilization lately and we hope that a positive trend will continue,” said James Montalto, spokesperson for William Floyd’s district in south Brookhaven Town.

Authorities at both levels have stepped up efforts to inform the public of the numbers of affected students, teachers and other school staff. The health department updates these numbers daily, district by district, on a website for its New York State School COVID Bulletin.

However, the Hempstead District, which is Nassau’s largest K-12 system with around 6,600 students, has recently come under fire for not reporting the cases in Albany, as required by the state. District Superintendent Regina Armstrong told Newsday on Wednesday that COVID-19 data would be reported correctly, starting this week.

Armstrong said 21 people in the district were infected last month and the system was forced in one case to send an entire class home for distance education for about 10 days. All other classes continued to be educated at the school five days a week, the superintendent said.

Hempstead did not begin reporting cases to the state last month because he was concerned about tackling the pandemic locally, Armstrong said.

“Our priority was centered on the students, on dealing with the parents’ anxieties and doing everything we could to put them at ease,” she said in a telephone interview. “We have not had any transmission of the disease in the district itself.”

Outside the school system, some civic leaders and residents complained that they were not receiving adequate information about health risks. In late September, several relatives of school staff sent a message to Newsday from an assistant teacher at Jackson Main District Elementary School who they said complained of feeling ill and was subsequently sent home and tested positive, but not before spending several hours at school.

Melissa Figueroa, a former school counselor for Hempstead, said she heard about the incident in Jackson Main and that it illustrated a larger problem.

“Unfortunately, this is a persistent problem in the Hempstead district,” said Figueroa, a civic activist who works on behalf of the district’s Latino community. “Hempstead is an epicenter of the pandemic, and the district must act to ensure parents have correct information in real time. We deserve to know the truth.”

Armstrong, when asked about the issues reported to Jackson Main, said, “This is the first time I’ve heard of this.” She added that the district’s policy was to notify all parents of students in close contact with an infected person.

Hempstead posted a notification on the state’s website on Wednesday that a staff member was infected at Jackson’s main school. The post did not include the previous 21 infections mentioned in the Superintendent’s message to Newsday.

State health officials began requiring districts to report cases on their website in mid-September. Many districts began to notify parents weeks earlier.

As might be expected, the greatest number of infections have occurred in the systems with the greatest numbers.

William Floyd’s District, with a total enrollment of around 8,900, reported 322 cases among students, teachers and other staff on Thursday. That cumulative total was up more than 140% from the 129 cases reported at the end of September.

“Although the cases have been higher than what we would like to start the school year, we have not seen a significant spread of COVID at school,” said Montalto, district spokesperson for William Floyd . “Our administrative staff continue to work hard on contact tracing seven days a week to ensure that anyone who may have been exposed is notified in a timely manner.”

Levittown, which had around 7,000 students, reported 89 cases on Thursday. That cumulative number was a 41% increase from the 63 cases reported last month. Superintendent Tonie McDonald said measures taken by the district to guard against infection included creating new outdoor learning spaces at three schools.

McDonald added that the cases of infection had been attributed to “activities outside our schools.”

Massapequa, with about 6,500 students, has reported 106 cases. This is a 108% increase from the 51 cases listed at the end of last month.

“We have set up tents in each building to encourage outdoor experiences, encourage regular mask breaks, hydration, hand washing and appropriate social distancing,” said Superintendent Brian L. Conboy.

Officials from William Floyd, Levittown and Massapequa all said education at the school was maintained and no classes were moved away due to the quarantines.


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Long road to the 2021 Boston Marathon – The Suffolk Journal https://robins-island.org/long-road-to-the-2021-boston-marathon-the-suffolk-journal/ https://robins-island.org/long-road-to-the-2021-boston-marathon-the-suffolk-journal/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 07:59:44 +0000 https://robins-island.org/long-road-to-the-2021-boston-marathon-the-suffolk-journal/ Boylston Street was filled with the sounds of cowbells and cheers as runners from around the world crossed the finish line of the 125th Boston Marathon on Monday. The marathon took place in person for the first time since April 2019, with last year’s race being postponed due to the pandemic. COVID-19 security restrictions were […]]]>

Boylston Street was filled with the sounds of cowbells and cheers as runners from around the world crossed the finish line of the 125th Boston Marathon on Monday.

The marathon took place in person for the first time since April 2019, with last year’s race being postponed due to the pandemic. COVID-19 security restrictions were in place for all participants.

For returning runners like Hana Baskin and Allen Badour of North Carolina, running the marathon again was a long overdue reunion.

“It’s really nice to be in a big crowd again,” said Baskin, a high school math teacher. “It was fucking awesome.”

It was Baskin’s sixth Boston Marathon.

Badour competed in the London Marathon the week before and said the Boston course was much more difficult in comparison due to the particularly difficult terrain that runners have to adapt to.

“It is one of the emblematic courses. The city embraces racing like nothing else; it’s so much fun, ”he said. “To have done it in the year of the bombing, and the following years, seeing the city come together is just a beautiful thing.”

The marathon holds a special place in the hearts of many students at the University of Suffolk, such as Michaela Zouharis senior.

“I always love going to the Boston Marathon, it makes me so proud of my city. I’ve been watching it since I was a kid and now I watch it every year, ”Zouharis said.

Kenya’s Diana Kipyogei and Benson Kipruto won their respective elite divisions, with times of 2:24:50 and 2:09:51. Manuela Schar and Marcel Hug from Switzerland won the wheelchair category of the marathon, with times of 1:35:21 and 1:11:18.

It was Kipyogei and Kipruto’s first marathon victory, and Schar’s third.

It was also the first time that the marathon was held in the fall, as it normally takes place on Patriots’ Day each spring. The next Boston Marathon will take place at April 2022.

Follow Shealagh on Twitter @ShealaghS.


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New details released on death of Hampton Roads real estate agent killed in murder-suicide https://robins-island.org/new-details-released-on-death-of-hampton-roads-real-estate-agent-killed-in-murder-suicide/ https://robins-island.org/new-details-released-on-death-of-hampton-roads-real-estate-agent-killed-in-murder-suicide/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://robins-island.org/new-details-released-on-death-of-hampton-roads-real-estate-agent-killed-in-murder-suicide/ PORTSMOUTH, Virginia – Non-lethal baton shells still litter the driveway at 74 Bolling Road in Portsmouth, the scene of a tragic and bizarre murder-suicide on Friday night. “He bought the home site without being seen in Alabama, moved in here Thursday and called a real estate agent on Friday to return the house,” a neighbor […]]]>

PORTSMOUTH, Virginia – Non-lethal baton shells still litter the driveway at 74 Bolling Road in Portsmouth, the scene of a tragic and bizarre murder-suicide on Friday night.

“He bought the home site without being seen in Alabama, moved in here Thursday and called a real estate agent on Friday to return the house,” a neighbor told News 3.

The neighbor says that 84-year-old Albert Baglione had just moved into the house before the tragedy unfolded. Soren Arn-Oelschlegel, a real estate agent, came to the house to help the unhappy man with the purchase of his house.

The police then intervened at the home at around 6 p.m.

It was then that Baglione said he had killed his real estate agent.

Arn-Oelschlegel, who worked for Long & Foster in Suffolk, was shot dead in the house.

“He called his son after he shot the real estate agent,” the neighbor said.

When the police arrived, they spoke with Baglione, who was holding a gun. He then closed the door, and that’s when a SWAT team arrived.

A few minutes later, they heard a gunshot – Baglione had turned the gun on him.

“The Hampton Roads LGBTQ community has lost a dynamic person [who’s] difficult to replace, ”said Rudy Almanzor.

Almanzor is President of Hampton Roads Pride. Arn-Oelschlegel had been a member of the LGBTQ association for over a decade, a passionate volunteer active in the LGBTQ community.

“He’s always had tons of energy. I’ve never seen him without a smile, laughing and wanting to have fun. He worked hard, played hard,” Almanzor said.

Almanzor was stunned to hear the news, confused as to why and how it could have happened.

“I literally had to read it four to five times and I was like, ‘This doesn’t make sense,'” he said. “We are here to build a community, and one of our building blocks is missing.”

Hampton Roads Pride will be holding a memorial service this week in honor of Arn-Oelschlegel.


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Exclusive park lease to Calverton sports club draws criticism https://robins-island.org/exclusive-park-lease-to-calverton-sports-club-draws-criticism/ https://robins-island.org/exclusive-park-lease-to-calverton-sports-club-draws-criticism/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 09:08:57 +0000 https://robins-island.org/exclusive-park-lease-to-calverton-sports-club-draws-criticism/ Last month, the Suffolk County Legislature voted to renew a 25-year lease for a private Calverton club use of more than 260 acres of county-owned land and a stretch of one mile from the Peconic River for private shooting, fishing and other sporting events. But critics cry foul. The Peconic River Sportsman’s Club, which had […]]]>

Last month, the Suffolk County Legislature voted to renew a 25-year lease for a private Calverton club use of more than 260 acres of county-owned land and a stretch of one mile from the Peconic River for private shooting, fishing and other sporting events. But critics cry foul.

The Peconic River Sportsman’s Club, which had already obtained a lease from the county in 1998, has benefited from the use of the property for decades. Signs on county-owned land surrounded by a fence around the property warn visitors that “trespassing for any purpose is strictly prohibited,” but the county says the group has no use “Exclusive” to the facility because “the group offers many opportunities for the public to participate in on-site programs,” including “shooting matches and competitions, fishing events, charity events.”

Leg. Al Krupski (D-Southold), who co-sponsored the measure with Suffolk County Director Steve Bellone, said the group had approached him to speed up approval of the lease four years before it expired so he could continue to plan longer term events.

Suffolk has owned the property since 1963, according to the board resolution, and then “attributed” it to the former Babylon Rod and Gun Club, which renamed itself Peconic River Sportman’s Club in 1977. The approved legislation states that it “shall be maintained, operated and managed by the Club as an open or green space and buffer zone.”

“It’s a really beautiful place,” Krupski said on Wednesday. The resolution extols the use of the property for hunting, fishing, nature photography, canoeing, hiking and nature study. But unless specifically instructed, ordinary county residents wouldn’t know the land belongs to county park, let alone have access to it, said John Turner, an ecologist with the Seatuck Environmental Association.

“I don’t know anything like it [lease arrangement] anywhere, ”Turner said.

During a recent site visit, he said he pointed out no trespassing signs at the fenced property line warning potential visitors to stay away. “This sign is clearly misleading,” he said. “The land is owned by you and me. “

State Assembly Steve Englebright (D-Seatauket) questioned the legality of the county entering into the exclusive contract as well as gated access to a more than one mile stretch of the Peconic River within Reserve.

“In each case, it seems to me that there is a violation of public confidence and possibly of the law regarding the alienation of park land and the public’s rights to access water. and public lands, ”he said.

Dick Amper, executive director of the Long Island Pine Barrens Society, a preservation group, said the county lease “should never have been. It excludes the public interest from the value of this property. It doesn’t. shouldn’t be in the hands of a private club. “

Turner recently wrote to County Parks Commissioner Jason Smagin urging him to “look out for the best interests” of county taxpayers by including a provision in the final lease that “guarantees the general public meaningful and regular access to property. so that he can profit from the property that they collectively own. He noted that when the new lease expires, residents of Suffolk will no longer have access to the park for “86 consecutive years.”

Emily Lauri, director of community relations for the parks department, said the Peconic River Sportsman’s Club pays the county an annual royalty of $ 9,301.48 with a 3% annual increase for land use. The deal prohibits the club from making “changes” without the department’s approval. The club must also clean up the slopes every five years or less, and maintain fire halls and fences. Turner, noting that a six-foot-high fence essentially surrounds the park, said this was problematic for the free movement of wildlife.

Krupski argued that the Sportsmen’s Arrangement is no different from other county concessions such as the Indian Island Golf Course in which an outside vendor manages and operates the property on behalf of the county. Hikers, he noted, can’t just walk on the golf course.

But visitors cannot access Peconic River Sportsman’s Club without an invitation. The property has two locked key card accesses to a gated entrance on Connecticut Avenue and River Road across from the old Grumman site in Calverton. The group’s website, while touting its use by federal and local law enforcement agencies for weapons training and charity events, does not provide any information on how county residents can access or join the area. the group, which collects $ 628,000 per year in membership fees, according to Guidestar.org. Its annual revenues in 2020 were just under $ 1 million, with assets valued at just under $ 3.2 million. Lauri said the group does not charge outside groups for using the site and that no Bellona or county officials are members.

A club member who answered the facility’s phone on Wednesday declined to comment and calls to the club were not returned.

Turner said he was able to speak to Smagin this week to ask the county to make a deal in the new lease that would make the part of the county accessible to the public at times it is not used for shooting events.

The property includes a man-made pond created decades ago by a damn Peconic river, which runs through the property.

Turner said a last-minute proposal under consideration by the Parks Department would allow the athlete’s club to determine when access is granted to non-members, a plan he called “inappropriate.”

Krupski said he asked in the legislative session whether the public is seeking access to the property. Smagin, he said, “hadn’t heard of any demand for its use.”

Turner said it was likely because no one knew about the property, let alone that they were collectively owned.

“I don’t know of any other situation like this anywhere, on or off Long Island,” he said. “It seems to me to be a unique set of circumstances. It is very disturbing. Why would the public want to support the expenses” for the purchase of the land if they cannot visit the property?

Lauri said residents of the county have many alternatives to the sports club.

“The county has thousands of acres in the vicinity of this property, which allows for regular use by the public, but if this agreement did not exist there would be a tremendous amount of additional financial and human resources required to provide these recreational opportunities… to the public, ”she wrote. “This organization and this agreement allows for activities and maintenance of the property that the county does not and would be unable to provide.”


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Cops: Driver passed 100mph moments before Quogue crash https://robins-island.org/cops-driver-passed-100mph-moments-before-quogue-crash/ https://robins-island.org/cops-driver-passed-100mph-moments-before-quogue-crash/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:22:50 +0000 https://robins-island.org/cops-driver-passed-100mph-moments-before-quogue-crash/ A driver’s speed had reached around 106 mph in just 3½ seconds before his car crashed head-on into a crowded Uber on the corner of Quogue this summer, killing himself and four others, village police said on Friday. Its impact speed was 86 mph “with no indication of braking,” police said in a press release, […]]]>

A driver’s speed had reached around 106 mph in just 3½ seconds before his car crashed head-on into a crowded Uber on the corner of Quogue this summer, killing himself and four others, village police said on Friday.

Its impact speed was 86 mph “with no indication of braking,” police said in a press release, near a stretch of the Montauk highway where the limit is 40 mph and the “suggested speed” “for the curve is 30 mph. The other vehicle, a Toyota Prius, was traveling at 27 mph on impact, compared to 38 mph before it began to brake, police said.

The findings on how fast drivers were moving, by state police, are based on forensic analyzes of “black box” event data recorders in vehicles.

The crash happened on July 24 at around 11:15 p.m. as the high-speed car, a red Nissan Maxima, was driven west by Justin B. Mendez, 22, of Shirley, and struck the ‘Uber eastbound.

Moments earlier, an undisclosed police officer attempted to stop Mendez and briefly activated the patrol car’s flashing lights after seeing Mendez driving west at speed of at least 55 mph, Police Chief Christopher B. Isola said. in the days following the accident.

Farhan Zahid, 32, of Bay Shore, an Uber driver and married father of three, was also killed in the crash. with three of his passengers, Michael O. Farrell, 20; her brother, James P. Farrell, 25; and a childhood friend, Ryan J. Kiess, 25, all of Manhasset.

A fourth passenger, Brianna M. Maglio, 25, of Garden City, who is a nurse at the New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan and Kiess’ girlfriend, was seriously injured.

The father of the Farrell brothers filed legal documents weeks after the crash that said he plans to suffolk County, Quogue and the village police department.

The newspapers cite Suffolk for what they describe as poor road design and lack of necessary maintenance on a section allegedly known for crashes.

And the documents against Quogue allege that a village police officer precipitated the accident by launching a pursuit of Mendez, and then “failing to end the pursuit / tracking of Mendez’s vehicle in time, as he became evident that Mendez was aware that he was being pursued / followed. ” The risk, according to the newspapers, “was too great and unwarranted given the physical location of the pursuit and the time of day.”

The The police press release quotes an eastbound driver that night telling officers he saw a car with no lights on “and she was completely passed out.”

“When this vehicle passed me, it looked like the vehicle was going over 100 miles an hour, which looked like a race car, took my breath away. Then I saw a police car. with the hazard lights on about 100 meters or 10 to 15 seconds behind the red car, the police car making no progress in reducing the distance between them, ”the statement quoted the witness as saying.

Village police said there was no criminal investigation as Mendez died in the crash.

Ryan Kiess’ father Kurt Kiess asked in a statement to Newsday whether Mendez “was pressured into such reckless driving in an attempt to escape the pursuit of the Quogue police.”

He said there were unanswered questions, including the officer’s top speed and the length of any pursuit.

Kiess said he was awaiting the release of the crash reconstruction report, along with footage from the dashcam and radio communications.

In their press release, Quogue Police said the New York State Attorney General’s office had reviewed the case and “indicated there was no reason to prosecute the police officer.” .

The office did not immediately return a call and email asking for confirmation.

Asked about any investigation into how fast the officer was traveling in the moments leading up to the crash, Quogue Mayor Peter Sartorius declined to respond, saying the village would only release what is in the press release from the police on the accident. He cited the ongoing litigation as declining to comment.

“That’s all we’re going to say about it, certainly for now,” he said.

Quogue Police Lt. Daniel Hartman did not respond to a call for more information.

Ryan Kiess and the Farrell brothers played lacrosse at Manhasset High School.

Kiess continued to play lacrosse at the University of Scranton. After his studies, he was recently promoted to the accounting firm KPMG.

James Farrell then played college lacrosse at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was a team captain in his senior year. Michael Farrell played in midfield for Manhasset and attended Villanova University.

Zahid, the Uber driver, was born in Pakistan and moved to the United States five years ago. He lived in Bay Shore with his wife and three children aged 6, 3 and 16 months.

Last month, Newsday reported that Suffolk County had the highest number of motor vehicle-related deaths in New York State – 113 killed, according to preliminary figures for 2020 tracked by the Institute for Traffic Safety Management and Research from Albany – from all counties.


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NHS England promises new dental services in Suffolk https://robins-island.org/nhs-england-promises-new-dental-services-in-suffolk/ https://robins-island.org/nhs-england-promises-new-dental-services-in-suffolk/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 06:30:00 +0000 https://robins-island.org/nhs-england-promises-new-dental-services-in-suffolk/ The NHS has pledged to bring new dental services to Suffolk next summer – but campaigners say the wait for treatment is ‘outrageous’. NHS England has written MP for Central Suffolk and North Ipswich, Dr Dan Poulter, to confirm the purchase of seven-day services. However, the Toothless in Suffolk campaign group criticized the delay and […]]]>

The NHS has pledged to bring new dental services to Suffolk next summer – but campaigners say the wait for treatment is ‘outrageous’.

NHS England has written MP for Central Suffolk and North Ipswich, Dr Dan Poulter, to confirm the purchase of seven-day services.

However, the Toothless in Suffolk campaign group criticized the delay and said patients were turning to private care and charity treatment.

A number of towns in Suffolk have lost their dental practices in the past 18 months – with two surgeries shutting down in Leiston alone.

This has forced some patients based in east Suffolk to seek NHS dental treatment from as far away as north Essex or go private.


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Dr Poulter wrote to NHS England chief executive Amanda Pritchard in late August after receiving concerns from a number of people living in her constituency.

In the response, the NHS said it was purchasing new dental services for Suffolk and Norfolk, which will provide services to adults and children.

Dr Poulter praised the commitment, but was “disappointed” to learn that patients could wait nine months or more for new services.

He said: “Many residents have contacted me to describe the difficulties they have encountered in accessing NHS dental services.

“In addition to struggling to get routine NHS dental appointments, a number of these residents suffered from pain and discomfort and could not access emergency dental care.

“While I am happy to have secured this engagement from NHS England, I remain disappointed that we are considering a nine-month timeline until these enhanced services become available.

‘It is vital that Suffolk residents can access appropriate NHS dental care when needed and I will continue to lobby NHS England to ensure the timely delivery of dental services in central Suffolk and the north of ‘Ipswich. “

Steve Marsling, from Toothless in Suffolk, said: “Having to wait nine months is absolutely outrageous. People are in pain, they can’t wait that long.

“This is an emergency. People are suffering and experiencing financial hardship.

“This timetable is totally unacceptable to Toothless in Suffolk – we are not taking this into our own hands.”


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Scott Carroll, known as the ‘South Shore Rapist’ in the 1980s, dies in prison https://robins-island.org/scott-carroll-known-as-the-south-shore-rapist-in-the-1980s-dies-in-prison/ https://robins-island.org/scott-carroll-known-as-the-south-shore-rapist-in-the-1980s-dies-in-prison/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 16:43:36 +0000 https://robins-island.org/scott-carroll-known-as-the-south-shore-rapist-in-the-1980s-dies-in-prison/ The “South Shore Rapist” – the serial predator who terrorized affluent neighborhoods in Babylon, Islip and other Long Island communities during the 1980s in a series of sexual assaults and robberies of four -year-old died in Coxsackie Correctional Facility on Friday, records show. Scott Carroll’s death has been confirmed by officials and the New York […]]]>

The “South Shore Rapist” – the serial predator who terrorized affluent neighborhoods in Babylon, Islip and other Long Island communities during the 1980s in a series of sexual assaults and robberies of four -year-old died in Coxsackie Correctional Facility on Friday, records show.

Scott Carroll’s death has been confirmed by officials and the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Services website.

Carroll, 60, was the first accused in New York state whose conviction was largely based on a voice composition. He was sentenced to 650 years in prison in 1988, although he likely would not have served more than 50 years due to a state-imposed cap on consecutive sentences.

The DOCCS website did not list a cause of death. John Martin, a funeral director who works with the Greene County coroner’s office, said Carroll died of natural causes but he was prohibited by law from developing.

“I would classify Scott Carroll as the most dangerous criminal in Suffolk County history,” said the retired Suffolk Police Detective. Bob Doyle, who led the task force that apprehended Carroll and, during his career, was involved in 200 homicide investigations.

Doyle said Carroll was also suspected of burglaries and sexual assaults in Florida in the 1980s, and investigators believed he was the “East End rapist” responsible for a spate of sexual assaults in east Suffolk in the 1970s as a teenager.

The attacks he has been accused of began in January 1984 and ended in February 1987 when Carroll, then 27, was arrested. The youngest victim was 11, Doyle said, and the oldest was 60.

Prosecutors said Carroll stalked his victims for days, then broke into homes and confronted them in their beds, holding a screwdriver under their throats. He would put a pillowcase over their head, lead them outside and rape them before taking them back to their rooms.

“I have represented terrible people,” said retired criminal defense attorney Eric Naiburg, Carroll’s attorney at his trial in 1988. “He was the worst.

Most burglars avoid occupied homes – and potential confrontations with residents – but Carroll appeared to be delighted, according to Doyle.

“If he hadn’t been arrested he would have taken it to the next level,” said the retired cop, “and the next level was murder.”

Carroll, a factory worker from Staten Island, was convicted in May 1988 of 31 counts in an indictment of 54 counts, including four rapes and one attempted rape. The jury, which deliberated for 10 days, was deadlocked on 21 other charges. Carroll was acquitted of two counts of burglary.

One victim, who was 16 when Carroll broke into her home and raped her, said she had built a fulfilling life in the decades since the attack but the trauma continues to haunt her. One consolation, she said, is that she no longer has to write letters every two years asking a parole board to keep Carroll in jail.

“He doesn’t deserve to walk the same earth as me,” the woman said. Newsday does not identify victims of sexual assault.

She’s become an advocate for victims of crime and wants offenders like Carroll to be eligible for parole every four years, rather than every two. Victims, she said, should not have to review traumatic crimes every two years.

“The fact that he’s dead doesn’t change the fact that she has to live with victimization,” said Laura Ahearn, executive director of the Crime Victims Center.

Doyle led a task force of 40 detectives from the Nassau and Suffolk Police Department who scoured reports of similar crimes in Long Island and New York City. The investigation took place long before the widespread use of computers and the Internet, Doyle said, and the work was difficult.

Investigators ultimately identified Carroll as a suspect after his arrest for similar crimes in Florida.

Carroll wore a ski mask during the attacks, making it difficult for victims to identify him. Doyle said investigators surreptitiously taped Carroll, who had served time in jail for car theft, speaking to his parole officer. They presented this recording and tapes of four other men saying the same thing. Six victims were able to identify Carroll through his voice.

The victim praised Doyle and other cops who brought Carroll to justice. “The police were amazing,” she said. “They were my lawyers.


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