Earl of stirling – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ Tue, 10 May 2022 02:20:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://robins-island.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T005401.436.png Earl of stirling – Robins Island http://robins-island.org/ 32 32 Decolonizing the library is not getting rid of Jane Austen https://robins-island.org/decolonizing-the-library-is-not-getting-rid-of-jane-austen/ Fri, 06 May 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://robins-island.org/decolonizing-the-library-is-not-getting-rid-of-jane-austen/ A university was recently erroneously reported to be “decolonizing” its curriculum by removing Jane Austen — Open Democracy THE Daily Telegraph’s headline was stark: “Jane Austen dropped out of college English course to ‘decolonise curriculum’”. The story was quickly picked up elsewhere. Austen had been ‘canceled’ in favor of black American Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, […]]]>

A university was recently erroneously reported to be “decolonizing” its curriculum by removing Jane Austen — Open Democracy

THE Daily Telegraph’s headline was stark: “Jane Austen dropped out of college English course to ‘decolonise curriculum’”. The story was quickly picked up elsewhere.

Austen had been ‘canceled’ in favor of black American Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, reported GB News, the right-wing opinion-driven TV channel that launched last year to correct ‘woke warriors’ . The Daily Mail published a particularly provocative headline: “No Pride, lots of Prejudice”.

Little attention was paid to the statement issued by the Scottish University in the center of the row. Denying “erroneous media reports”, a spokesperson for the University of Stirling said it had “not removed or replaced – and we do not intend to remove or replace – the Jane Austen’s teaching of our program”.

But it was too late for the facts: decolonization was back in the national debate. This time it was a swear word, even though less than two months have passed since the UK government issued controversial guidelines stating that the British Empire should be taught in schools in a ‘balanced way’.

To update Austen’s famous opening line in Pride and Prejudice, it is a universally acknowledged truth that decolonization is fiendishly difficult and savagely contested. The history of the term, however, is not as much debated as the process. It is believed to have been used for the first time in 1836 by the French journalist Henri Fonfrède, in an article on the French occupation of Algeria. German economist Moritz Julius Bonn is credited with establishing the term as an academic concept some 100 years later.

Until the 1960s, decolonization was defined as a political phenomenon, but it has grown to include everything affected by the colonial experience, whether political, economic, cultural or psychological. In ‘Decolonization A brief history of the word’, published in 2012, the American historian Raymond F Betts notes: “Google listed as of December 1, 2010 some 750,000 sites to be decolonized”. As of April 20, 2022, there were about 11,700,000 results, or about 11 million more.

“Decolonization has become a common phrase rather than a practice,” says Deirdre Osborne, one of three co-authors of This is the canon: decolonize your shelves in 50 books. The recently published book, written by Osborne, Joan Anim-Addo and Kadija Sesay, is not meant to be a confrontation with the existing canon, but a way to expand and democratize it. Rather than recommending a mass cleansing of, say, the three Williams of the traditional Western literary canon – Shakespeare, Golding and Blake – the authors suggest an alternative selection.

“There’s no point in abandoning the canon,” says Anim-Addo, “it’s too ingrained in who we are.” We can’t pretend we can make it go away, but we can get a more realistic idea of ​​the world.

‘I love [Charles Dickens’s] Tough times,” adds Sesay. “I would never throw it away.” Rather than dismiss Dickens, Sesay would like to use the 1854 classic, set in a fictional Victorian industrial town, as a template for a contemporary African novel. “Maybe in the deep pit mines of South Africa or the surface mines of Sierra Leone,” she says.

This sweet assemblage of literary styles and stories across geographies and cultures is typical of the approach taken by the literary trio – two academics and a writer – to what Osborne calls the “thorny problem” of open to reading.

To that end, This is the Canon is an eclectic playlist disguised as a book. It includes writers and stories from around the world, with a particular focus on three ocean regions, the Atlantic, India and the Pacific. Featured writers include African-American Octavia E Butler, British-Jamaican Andrea Levy, Antigua-American Jamaica Kincaid, Franco-Guadean Simone Schwarz-Bart, British-Indian GV Desani, Algerian Assia Djebar , Trinidadian Earl Lovelace and Indigenous Australians Alexis Wright and Tony. Birch.

“It’s about putting together the missing pieces of literature, the pieces of the jigsaw and understanding the tangled lives we live,” says Anim-Addo, who together with Osborne launched Britain’s first Masters in Black British Literature in 2015.

Anim-Addo makes a good point. Our lives are deeply, inextricably intertwined, as shown in the “Adventures of Ngunga”, an early example of decolonized children’s tales, written by Angolan activist Artur Pestana. In the 1980 book, a 13-year-old orphan is involved in the Angolan war of liberation from Portuguese rule. The settlers are all portrayed unflatteringly, but so are some black Angolans. It makes the story more real and complex, says Richard Phillips, professor of human geography at the University of Sheffield. Translated into English, the book offered British readers an “anti-Eurocentric understanding of Africa”, says Phillips, “in which Africans speak for themselves and describe their own land, people and interests”.

In recent decades, the same has happened with fiction in India and other parts of Asia, as well as in whole swathes of Africa. In an article titled “Whodunnit in Southern Africa” ​​for the think tank Africa Research Institute, British academic Ranka Primorac notes the decolonization of African shelves over the years. Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Raymond Chandler, James Hadley Chase and others increasingly gave way to local writers adapting the popular form of “detective novel” to local cultures.

Mind over matter

BUT is decolonization really as simple as getting British children to read books like ‘The Adventures of Ngunga’ or making sure African readers have their own mystery novels? Is it to get adult readers anywhere to immerse themselves in any or all of the 50 novels suggested in It’s the cannon? What if we decolonized mentalities? Isn’t this hampered by larger forces such as geopolitics, the international financial architecture and the functioning of modern markets?

The authors of It’s the cannon say “reading habits are fundamentally linked to mentalities”. Encouraging readers to “go on adventures” allows them to explore new worlds, encounter a wide range of beliefs, and see things from different perspectives. According to the authors, this helps change mindsets over time.

Small changes can, in small ways, set the agenda, says Anim-Addo. “If people are waiting for the biggest changes to happen, we’re already defeated.” These small changes presumably include replacing the “imperial gaze,” that angle of vision adopted by Europeans in the colonies, when entire continents and their inhabitants were rendered featureless for readers.

The debate on decolonization also means resolutely breaking away from the “post-colonial” label formerly applied to literature. “I don’t use that term,” Sesay says, “it was an imposed label, imposed as if it were a badge of honor, as it reinforces the suggestion that those who are called ‘post-colonial ” still live in conditions, which impose an inferior mentality on people. Osborne agrees, adding, “I follow Indigenous author Tony Birch’s view that ‘post-colonialism’ is not a luxury than for the academy.

Increasingly, writers from formerly colonized countries are taking control of the narrative. Two notable recent debuts are Elnathan John’s 2016 novel Born on a Tuesday and Jokha Alharthi’s 2019 book Celestial bodies. Both are reclaiming their home territories – northern Nigeria and Oman, respectively – following relentless disaster reporting or a persistent lack of reporting. John shows that life in the Muslim north of Nigeria is more than the terrorist atrocities of Boko Haram. Alharthi, whose novel won the International Man Booker Prize for Literature, paints a vivid picture of Oman and its people, the struggles against the British and the battle for modernity amidst tradition.

Neither the novelties in It’s the cannon but, then, the writing trio never said that was the final word – or even canon. The title, says Anim-Addo, was simply meant to “provoke a debate about what a cannon is”.

When the first critical study of decolonization — “The Wretched of the Earth” by Martinican author Frantz Fanon — was published in 1961, a review in the American magazine Time said: “This is not so much a book as a stone thrown against the windows of the West.’ As the debate over decolonization – of bookshelves and everything else – continues, this latest suggestion for a new literary canon is not a stone, but perhaps a gentle garden hose focused on filthy Western windows. .

OpenDemocracy.net, May 1. Rashmee Roshan Lall writes on international affairs. She has lived and worked in eight countries over the past decade, including Afghanistan, Haiti and Tunisia.

]]>
Stirling advisers announced – Brig Newspaper https://robins-island.org/stirling-advisers-announced-brig-newspaper/ Fri, 06 May 2022 13:35:58 +0000 https://robins-island.org/stirling-advisers-announced-brig-newspaper/ Stirling advisers announced – Brig Newspaper Welcome to Brig’s Diary Click to listen to the highlighted text! Welcome to Brig’s Diary Previous story Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness review: A dark turning point for Marvel ★★★★☆ Next story Air3 […]]]>


Stirling advisers announced – Brig Newspaper
























Welcome to Brig’s Diary

Click to listen to the highlighted text!
Welcome to Brig’s Diary


Previous story

Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness review: A dark turning point for Marvel ★★★★☆




Next story

Air3 radio celebrates its 50th anniversary with a 50-hour broadcast






Latest blog news
















The Stirling University Marketing Society, founded in 2019, has gone dormant.…


















MUSIC: Four-piece band Big Image have released their debut EP “Human Touch Is Forever”…


















SPORTS: the return of SUDC on stage after 3 years of absence with ‘Back in the Spotlight’…


















NEWS: Scotland’s oldest student radio turns 50 this year…


















FILM & TV: Director Sam Raimi is taking this Marvel movie in a whole new direction that…















Click to listen to the highlighted text!








]]>
Voters in Stirling are set to go to the polls to choose councilors on May 5 – here’s a reminder of the candidates in your areas https://robins-island.org/voters-in-stirling-are-set-to-go-to-the-polls-to-choose-councilors-on-may-5-heres-a-reminder-of-the-candidates-in-your-areas/ Wed, 04 May 2022 17:01:53 +0000 https://robins-island.org/voters-in-stirling-are-set-to-go-to-the-polls-to-choose-councilors-on-may-5-heres-a-reminder-of-the-candidates-in-your-areas/ Voters go to the polls tomorrow (Thursday) to elect the 23 people who will make up Stirling’s next Council. A total of 56 candidates are running in Stirling for local elections on May 5. While some residents who registered for an absentee ballot will have already cast their ballots, many will officially make their choices […]]]>

Voters go to the polls tomorrow (Thursday) to elect the 23 people who will make up Stirling’s next Council.

A total of 56 candidates are running in Stirling for local elections on May 5.

While some residents who registered for an absentee ballot will have already cast their ballots, many will officially make their choices in person at area polling stations tomorrow (Thursday).

The SNP is fielding 14 candidates, the Conservatives 11, Labor and the Liberal Democrats seven each and the Greens five. There are also four independents, an Alba candidate and the Scottish Family Party have a candidate in each ward in the Stirling Council area.

The 23 elected members of Stirling Council represent a total of seven wards.

After the 2017 elections, the ruling administration was formed by a coalition between the SNP and Labour, which had eight and four councilors respectively. The Conservatives formed the opposition with nine councilors – later reduced to eight when one became independent.

Voters will use the Single Transferable Vote (STV) system. Instead of putting a cross in the chosen box as is done in general elections, voters use numbers.

Ballots list all of the candidates running to be councilors in your ward.




The voter then numbers the candidates in order of choice by writing the number 1 in the box next to the name of the candidate who is your first choice, 2 in the box next to your second choice, 3 in the box next to your third choice, etc. You can make as many or as few choices as you want.

Here is a final reminder of the candidates in each district:

District 1, Trossachs and Teith

Martin Earl, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Wendy Faulkner, Scottish Greens

Josh Hamilton, Scottish Labor Party

Dolores Hughes Scottish Family Party

Gene Maxwell, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Galen Milne, Scottish Liberal Democrat

John Watson, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Elaine Watterson, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Ward 2, Forth and Endrick

Rob Davies, Independent

Rosemay Fraser, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Paul Goodwin, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Thomas Heald, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Paul Henke, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

James MacLaren, Scottish Liberal Democrat

Gerry McGarvey, Scottish Labor Party

Liam McKechnie, Scottish Family Day,

Ward Three, Dunblane and Bridge of Allan

Bill Cowan, Alba Party

Ewan Dillon, Scottish Labor Party

Douglas Dodds, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Graham Houston, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Ahsan Khan, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Alastair Majury, Independent

Fayzan Rehman, Scottish Liberal Democrat

Willy Stirling, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Alasdair Tollemache, Scottish Green

Nickie Willis, Scottish Family Party

Ward Four, North Stirling

Oliver Franklin, Scottish Liberal Democrat

Danny Gibson, Labor and Co-operative Party

Susan McGill, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Shena McLelland Scottish Family Party

Rachel Nunn, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Amy Smith, Scottish Greens

Jim Thomson, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Ward Five, Stirling West

Neil Benny, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Scott Farmer, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Morag Fulton, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Dick Moerman, Scottish Liberal Democrat

Alastair Pettigrew, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Jen Preston, Scottish Labor Party

Michael Willis, Scottish Family Party

Ward Six, East Stirling

Bryan Flannagan, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Linda Hendry, Scottish Greens

Chris Kane, Scottish Labor Party

Gary McGrow, Independent

Gerry McLaughlan, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Gordon Murphy, Scottish Liberal Democrat

Grant Thoms, Scottish National Party (SNP)

David Tortolano, Scottish Family Party

Ward Seven, Bannockburn

Margaret Brisley, Scottish Labor Party

Brian Hambly, Scottish National Party (SNP)

Sophie Hendry Scottish Family Party

Alasdair MacPherson, Independent

Hilary MacPherson, Scottish Liberal Democrat

Stuart McLuckie, Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Marie Stadtler, Scottish Greens

Diane Tortolano, Scottish National Party (SNP)

]]>
Can you call yourself a real Falkirk bairn? https://robins-island.org/can-you-call-yourself-a-real-falkirk-bairn/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://robins-island.org/can-you-call-yourself-a-real-falkirk-bairn/ Dunrowan Maternity. The name was certainly used in the 18th century when the motto “Better to meddle in the de’il than in the bairns of Falkirk” was common, and perhaps even earlier when people said, “You are like the bairns of Fa’ kirk: you will finish before repairing”. There is a local legend that says […]]]>
Dunrowan Maternity.
Dunrowan Maternity.

The name was certainly used in the 18th century when the motto “Better to meddle in the de’il than in the bairns of Falkirk” was common, and perhaps even earlier when people said, “You are like the bairns of Fa’ kirk: you will finish before repairing”.

There is a local legend that says that in the mid 1600s the Earl of Callendar provided the town with its first water supply at Cross Well near the steeple.

We are told he drank a quaich of water and toasted the health of the “women and children of Falkirk”. A bit romantic but unfortunately that’s all we have!

Register to our daily newsletter The Falkirk Herald Today

Part of the Falkirk Coat of Arms from around 1900 showing the motto referring to the bairns of Falkirk.

I have always understood that to be a real bairn of Falkirk you have to be born within the boundaries of the old burgh or at least within the sound of the steeple bell.

All was well as most babies were born at home, which was the norm until 1932 when the new Falkirk Royal Infirmary opened.

Its predecessor in Thornhill Road had no maternity unit and indeed the planners who designed the new infirmary did not include one until the government stepped in to provide the money to pay for a maternity unit. 24 beds.

You will recall that the rest of the wards were still funded by voluntary subscriptions, fees and donations and this only changed in 1948 with the creation of the NHS.

So, from 1932, hundreds of babies born in the infirmary were technically “bairns” even though they came from all over.

The growing number of ‘bairns’ was further increased in 1935 when a large private house called Dunrowan at Maggie Wood’s Loan was opened as a retirement home.

I think it was some sort of private escape from Falkirk Royal although I’m not sure.

All I know is that between that date and 1951 hundreds of people saw the light for the first time in the building which is still standing.

I was one of them and hardly a week goes by without meeting another Dunrowan bairn.

My friend Moira Kennedy was one of them and she recently gave me a copy of the bill paid by her parents for 10 days in Dunrowan at 5 guineas a week – that’s £7 and 10 shillings.

Add the cost of dressings etc. and the bill comes to 9:5s:6d!

Later the building was used as a nursing home and it remained part of the health service until recent years.

In 1987, a brand new state-of-the-art maternity ward was opened in the infirmary and the bairns’ future seemed assured.

But there were already worrying rumors of a possible closure and merger with Stirling and feelings boiled over in 1989.

The reaction in the city has been fierce to say the least with petitions, protest marches and rallies that seemed to change people’s minds for a while.

Finally, the decision to create the Forth Valley Royal Hospital led to the transfer to Stirling in 2004 and then to Larbert seven years later.

So, for the past 18 years, the only real bairns are the handful whose parents have chosen a home birth.

I hope there will be many more in the future.

]]>
Explore Castles in Scotland | Chicago Classic Magazine https://robins-island.org/explore-castles-in-scotland-chicago-classic-magazine/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 21:10:07 +0000 https://robins-island.org/explore-castles-in-scotland-chicago-classic-magazine/ BY JUDY CARMACK BROSS When I mentioned dinner in a castle dungeon, I caught the attention of my grandsons. And as appealing as it was to see, as we entered the old keep, an exact replica of King Robert the Bruce’s heavy sword used in the First War of Scottish Independence near Stirling, it was […]]]>

BY JUDY CARMACK BROSS

When I mentioned dinner in a castle dungeon, I caught the attention of my grandsons.

And as appealing as it was to see, as we entered the old keep, an exact replica of King Robert the Bruce’s heavy sword used in the First War of Scottish Independence near Stirling, it was not was just one of the memories of the Scottish castle in the Highlands. of Scotland, not to mention the Harry Potter Railway, which will hopefully one day bring them back to the land of their ancestors.

An armor presides over the guests in the dining room of the dungeon of Dalhousie Castle.

My grandsons Oliver and Henry at the Glenfinnan Viaduct.

Taking my grandsons Oliver, 12, and Henry, 9 (along with their parents – my son, George York, and his wife – and their aunt, my youngest daughter, Alice York) to Scotland was a dive into the country’s history. Scottish castles, whether they rise on islands like fortresses or in the mists across the moors, are an integral part of the often rugged landscape. From medieval fortresses to turreted neo-Gothic towers to unique defensive towers, it’s estimated that there have been 3,000 castles in Scotland’s history, and only 1 remain. 500 today. For the two boys, castles conjure up legends of heroic knights, mighty wizards, fierce creatures, epic battles and faraway adventures.

The castle is indeed a metaphor for Scotland. Its mountainous and even treacherous terrain surrounds something largely worthy of protection. The majestic peaks of the Highlands are monuments to the brave inhabitants of this magnificent place. Scottish history is replete with repeated episodes of incursion followed by abandonment to the understanding that Scotland cannot be conquered – just ask the Romans, Vikings and many other forces who eventually decided to stand give back to all that is sublime in this country of castles.

Highland waterfall.

After a short visit to London, the fast train took us to Edinburgh where we visited our first castle, the most famous of all in Scotland. Situated on a towering crag at the head of the Royal Mile, Edinburgh Castle has repelled many assaults on its ramparts, and its great gun, Mons Meg, one of the world’s largest guns by caliber and fitted for the first times in 1449, drew the rapidity of Henry and Oliver. Warning. It still fires daily at 1pm, heralding a moment of reflection on bravery, sacrifice and Scotland’s proud history.

Edinburgh Castle.

Oliver and George stand in front of the impressive Mons Meg.

Queen Margaret, who later became a saint, died at the castle in 1093. The small chapel built by her son, King David I, is Edinburgh’s oldest building. Mary Queen of Scots chose to give birth to her son, James VI, at this royal palace in 1566 due to its protected position. The Scottish Crown Jewels on display are Britain’s oldest, and the most moving is the Smooth Stone of Destiny, also known as the Stone of Scone, used for centuries to inaugurate monarchs, including the first King of Alba (original name of Scotland), Kenneth. MacAlpine, in 843. It was seized in 1296 by King Edward I of England and rested in Westminster Abbey until 1996, when it was officially returned to Scotland.

Choosing to travel to the Highlands over Spring Break meant we could take advantage of great winter rates at the two castles we stayed in and see others from less crowded vantage points. May to September are its busiest times, but we found the daffodils bursting forth as well as the beginnings of the yellow gorse that blankets the countryside in May. Thanks to the Gulf Stream flowing around the nearby Hebrides Islands, the temperature was pleasant “sweater weather”.

Ben Nevis.

With Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in the UK, as a backdrop, we spent two nights at 19andLast century Inverlochy Castle near Fort William in the Mid West Highlands. On a trip to Balmoral in 1873, Queen Victoria spent a week in Inverlochy sketching and painting and wrote in her diary: “I have never seen a more beautiful or romantic place. We heeded the warnings about climbing Ben Nevis when we learned that there were more climbing accidents there than on Everest, as people don’t prepare for the often icy conditions and steep climbs. Some sportsmen staying at the chateau seemed to prefer a game of billiards in the billiard room. Although pool tables are larger than pool tables, their six holes for sinking the 21 balls are smaller. But the children preferred the outside chessboard.

Children enjoying a game of chess outdoors.

We decided to stick with a tour starting at Loch Linnhe, a marine loch (lake) near Fort William. We learned that in this nearly deserted terrain several films had been shot depicting many eras due to the rugged and isolated beauty of the area. Not far from the boats to the Isle of Skye is a viaduct made famous by the Harry Potter films (on which you can take the Jacobite train known as the Harry Potter Express); the legendary Ossian’s Cave, atop the Three Sisters Mountains, featured in a James Bond film; and Rannoch Moor, with its marshland created during the last ice age. Known more recently as a filming location for the Foreign Television series, it also has a trivial history: it is the ancestral home of Scrooge McDuck!

Seeing the Glenfinnan Viaduct, built from 1897-1901, was a delight for Oliver and Henry who loved the Warner Brothers “Making of Harry Potter” studio exhibits near London. Our guide shared that visitors to the viaduct mainly fall into two categories: Potter fans wearing a wizard’s cape and history buffs (and it’s pretty easy to tell the two factions apart).

George and the children stand in front of The Knight Bus at Harry Potter Studios in England.

The history of the region, settled 5000 years ago, is rich in military victories and defeats and, of course, clan battles. The Picts lived in the area during the Iron Age and took their name from the Romans, possibly due to their tattooing. Due to the rugged terrain created by retreating glaciers, the Romans chose not to settle in this vast area which stretches to John o’ Groats in the far north of Scotland.

McDonald’s Castle.

The ruined castle, pictured above, proved fascinating, with its tales of family rivalry: that of the MacDonald and Campbell clans which ended in the massacre of Glencoe. The Earl of Argyll’s Regiment, led by the Campbells, were guests of the MacDonalds and proceeded to massacre 38 of their hosts and other guests. The MacDonalds had refused to swear allegiance to the new monarchs, William III and Mary II. The feud is still discussed to this day with generations of Scots said to “never trust a Campbell”. Scotland’s favorite poet, Sir Walter Scott, commemorated the massacre.

The dinners at Inverlochy couldn’t have been more delicious. George particularly enjoyed ‘savoring’ the full Scottish breakfasts, complete with haggis, while the children stayed with the pancakes and oatmeal sprinkled with brown sugar. Dinner included beautifully prepared dishes overseen by Chef Michael Roux Jr. For Scotch lovers, a separate bar featured an amazing collection, including the popular Ben Nevis variety (Alice and I kept their impressive selection of teas). And we were sure to try the “neeps and tatties” in the area.

Inverlochy Castle. Photo courtesy of Inverlochy Castle.

A view of the show at Inverlochy.

The hotel’s full Scottish breakfast.

Throughout the countryside, signs are in English and Gaelic, as a nod to the region’s heritage, although it is estimated that only 1% of Scotland’s population – more in Skye and the islands of the Inner Hebrides – speaks it. Speaking of traffic signs, if you’re driving, be aware that the roads are quite narrow, be careful.

In nearby Glencoe and many restaurants along the lochs, the seafood is incredible: tiny scallops, lobster, clams and wonderful oysters, not to mention terrific fish and chips.

Our ancestors, the Carmacks, who were members of the Clan Buchanan, lived along the shores of Loch Lomond. From the austere northern terrain to the gentle farmland adorned with newborn yew trees as we drove towards Perth, we could see why this striking landscape is one of the most famous in Scotland. After lunch along the Loch, we passed through Stirling, known as the gateway to the Highlands from the Lowlands, which served as the original residence of the Scone of Destiny and the seat of the first Scottish kings. The grand monument to William Wallace, the great hero of the battle for Scottish independence (and made iconic in our modern times by the film Brave heart), can be seen in the distance. We wished we could stop to learn more about Wallace’s Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297.

Loch Lomond.

Aldie Castle.

The destination of the day, and the challenge for all, was to discover Aldie Castle, home of the ancestors of the Mercer family, one of whom came to the United States in time to fight with General Washington. Using map coordinates and advice from a woman we met on a side road, we found Aldie Castle from a distance. George had visited when he was only six years old with his grandmother, my mother, Bonnie Carmack, who, without Google at the time, had found her by asking at the local post office. Granny, as Bonnie was known to her grandchildren, was an inspiration for the entire journey and journey of that particular day. With her spirit in our hearts and her binoculars close at hand, she also helped guide us – her daughter, two of her grandchildren and two of her great-grandchildren – to our destination.

It was all on the way to Dalhousie Castle, just outside Edinburgh, for that special dungeon dinner, surrounded by armor and swords, and a night at the hotel and spa, the most Scotland’s oldest inhabited castle with foundations laid 800 years ago. from.

Dalhousie Castle.

The famous dungeon dining room.

The key to one of our comfortable rooms, with four-poster beds and in-room kettles.

While many other fabulous sights, the newborn lambs frolicking in the Highlands and the wonderful meals, are part of our Scottish memories, the castles remain most etched in our memories through these three generations: “These castles are the heart fighter of this country. It was there that the heroes defended their home and established a national identity. You feel like you’re part of the story,” George said. “You feel your boots sinking into the marsh as you gaze across the loch to the castle on the opposite bank. You feel the sun shine, the humidity in the air and see the rocks glisten in the clouds. To stand here in this place with the family, it’s an experience that’s imprinted in your DNA, to be able to come back to honor our ancestors and introduce them to your children. It’s that connection that makes this trip truly special.

Photos courtesy of York and Bross families and public domain unless otherwise noted.

]]>
Carbon County Property Transfers – Times News Online https://robins-island.org/carbon-county-property-transfers-times-news-online/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:54:18 +0000 https://robins-island.org/carbon-county-property-transfers-times-news-online/ Registered deeds East Penn Township Daniel DeAngelo to Megan Markulics, 2348 E. Lizard Creek Road, Lehighton, property at 2348 E. Lizard Creek Road, $251,000. Franklin Township Agnes A. Kunkle at 4735 Long Run LLC, Newtown, two packages, $512,500. Keith Meyers to Kacie Smalley, 72 Penn St., Lehighton, property at 72 Penn St., $179,900. Shirley M. […]]]>

Registered deeds

East Penn Township

Daniel DeAngelo to Megan Markulics, 2348 E. Lizard Creek Road, Lehighton, property at 2348 E. Lizard Creek Road, $251,000.

Franklin Township

Agnes A. Kunkle at 4735 Long Run LLC, Newtown, two packages, $512,500.

Keith Meyers to Kacie Smalley, 72 Penn St., Lehighton, property at 72 Penn St., $179,900.

Shirley M. House at Shirley M. House, 140 Penn St., Lehighton, property at 140 Penn St., $1.

Sheak Ripon to Salima Khatun, 905 Green St., Lehighton, property at 905 Green St., $1.

Dennis W. Schaeffer to Dennis W. Schaeffer, 1724 Indian Hill Road, Lehighton, property at 1724 Indian Hill Road, and on Indian Hill Road, $1.

Alex W. Cormier, 795 Main Road, Lehighton, property at 795 Main Road, $135,530.

Troy M. Green at Troy M. Green, 1930 Forest Inn Road, Palmerton, property at 50 Briar St., $1.

Jim Thorpe

Jason A. Smith to Luz Monica Vega, 324 North St., Jim Thorpe, property at 324 North St., $200,000.

Craig Feuerstein to Thomas A. Chapman II, 3 Nature’s Way, Jim Thorpe, Alpine Acres Lot 15, $25,000.

Gerald T. Marcozzi to Marion Gavinovich, 528 South Ave., Jim Thorpe, property at 528 South Ave., $150,000.

Eddie Garcia II at Eddie Garcia II, Angola, New York, property at 513 South Ave., $1.

Matthew T. Neast at Thomas C. Neast, 12 Chestnut Ave., Jim Thorpe, property at 105 Center Ave., $1.

James J. Carroll to James J. Carroll, 19 E. 13th St., Jim Thorpe, property at 527 Lehigh St., $1.

Township of Kidder

Bernadetta McCarthy to HK PA ​​Properties LLC, Jackson, New Jersey, property on Stream Drive, $8,000.

Susan Eckert to Thomas J. Peterson, Iselin, New Jersey, lots 331 and 332, Pocono Mountain Lake, $20,000.

Gerald J. Donnini to Gerald Taylor Real Estate Holdings LLC, Jupiter, Florida, property on Lake Drive, Lake Harmony, $8,491.50.

Roger Eugene Gerhard to Albert Orsini, 309 Golden Oaks Drive, White Haven, property at 309 Golden Oaks Drive, $329,900.

Michael J. Szlachta to Anthony Tartaro, 46 ​​Chestnut Road, Lake Harmony, property at 21 Chestnut Road, Lake Harmony, $642,500.

Live Love Lake LLC to LunaHoldings LLC, 41 S. Lake Drive, Lake Harmony, property at 41 S. Lake Drive, $275,000.

Mariann Tuminia to Corwin Roth, Yardley, property at Chestnut and Hemlock Roads, Lake Harmony, $50,000.

Emily D. Lightfoot to Powley LLC, Mountain Top, Unit 4009, Building 28, Stage 2, Phase 1, Laurelwoods, $556,000.

Nancy Gratz to AFI Holdings LLC, West Caldwell, New Jersey, property at 140 S. Lake Drive, Lake Harmony, $850,000.

Daegyun Kim to Martin T. Nicoll, Jersey City, New Jersey, property at 54 Pineknoll Drive, Lake Harmony, $440,000.

Joan A. Curry to Lisandra Florek, Hillsborough, New Jersey, property at 89 Greenwood Road, Lake Harmony, $236,599.24.

Sparango Perkiomen Associates LP to Michael Hashemian, Collegeville, Lot 26, Section G-1, Split Rock, $180,000.

William Gustavson to William Gustavson, Lindenhurst, New York, property at 73 Warbler Court, Lake Harmony, $1.

Bettimarie Small to Glenn Spalding, Lansdale, estate on Pinebrook Drive, Lake Harmony, $11,000.

Edward Charkles Bullen to Steven Alessandrini, Flanders, New Jersey, property at 89 Wildbriar Court, Lake Harmony, $505,000.

Brianna Marie Villani to Vivek Purushottam, Warrington, property at 37 Summit Wind Drive, Lake Harmony, $525,000.

Gina M. Mateka at Gina M. Mateka, Sewell, New Jersey, property at 35 Split Rock Road, Lake Harmony, $1.

Arthur R. Bossler to Zachary Silverman, Wyncote, estate at 5 Lookout Point, Lake Harmony, $680,000.

Lansford

Waterfall Investments Corporation at Caromil Assets LLC, 846 Blakeslee Blvd. Drive E., Lehighton, property at 362 W. Abbott St., $28,500.

C & JS Realty LLC to Susquehanna River Rentals LLC, Bird In Hand, property at 201 E. Kline Ave., $245,000.

Retreat Property Management LLC to Susquehanna River Rentals LLC, Bird In Hand, property located at 231-233 E. Ridge St., $210,000.

Canton of Lausanne

Andrea Lesko to Harold J. Pudliner Jr., 245 N. Stagecoach Road, Weatherly, property at 215 N. Stagecoach Road, $1.

James R. Martini at James Martini, 100 White Pine Drive, Weatherly, property at 100 White Pine Drive, $1.

Township of Lehigh

Dana Grim at Dana Grim, Allentown, property at 959 Pine Ave., Weatherly, $1.

Glenn A. Miller to Nicholas Miller, 88 Miller Lane, Weatherly, 10,126 acres, S. Lehigh Gorge Drive, $35,131.50.

Michael William Hadzick IV to Brian O’Donnell, 635 North St., Jim Thorpe, property at 1516 S. Lehigh Gorge Drive, $275,000.

lehighton

Peter Sanders to Piotr Kesesk, 250 Plantation Drive, Lehighton, property at 252-254 S. Seventh St., $186,000.

TNT RE Holdings LLC to Dakota S. Bunting, 12 Second Ave., Lehighton, property at 12 Second Ave., $165,000.

Thomas E. Silvanek to Claire M. Bruch, 251 N. Second St., Lehighton, property at 251-253 N. Second St., $123,000.

Dolores M. Hontz to Timothy P. Hontz, Reisterstown, Md., property at 1049 Coal St., $1.

James Grover to Steven Farr, 720 Iron St., Lehighton, property at 720 Iron St., $179,000.

Byron D. Schnell to Aurel Cirstea, 5020 Best Station Road, Slatington, property at 611 Mahoning St., $125,000.

Carbon County Sheriff to US Bank NA, Fort Mill, SC, property at 414 S. Ninth St., $12,600.74.

Lower Township of Towamensing

Kyle Guedes to Troy A, Bollinger, 181 Penn St., Lehighton, property on Fireline Road, $56,000.

Cylde Brian Peffer to Panamint Farm LLC, Mineral, Va., property at 1810 Lower Smith Gal Road, Kunkletown, $1,250,000.

Corazon E. Feltham to Davis Stoner, Newton, New Jersey, property at 4430 Little Gap Road, $70,000.

Troy M. Green to Troy M. Green, 1930 Forest Inn Road, Palmerton, two transactions, properties on Hahn’s Dairy and Forest Inn roads, $1 each.

Mahoning Township

Martha Oschipko Hebert to Victoria G. Feller, 39 Dowbush Road, Lehighton, property on Rohach Avenue, $26,000.

Nesquehoning

Mildred A. Lempa to Julia A. Barwis, Churchville, property at 15 Hemlock Drive, $1.

Jason Farrell to Black Creek Junction Consulting Investing and Acquisitions LLC, 341-343 W. Catawissa St., Nesquehoning, property at 341-343 W. Catawissa St., $150,000.

Packer Township

Earl Titus to Rosalie Titus, 3562 Quakake Road, Weatherly, property at 3562 Quakake Road, $1.

Ronald D. Shofran to Brad Shofran, 1597 Hudson Drive, Weatherly, property at 1597 Hudson Drive, $1.

Palmerton

Salvador Rios at Ricardo Roos, 28 Lafayette Ave., Palmerton, property at 28 Lafayette Ave., $1.

Damitrious Rivera to Rhianna Rivera, 380 Lehigh Ave., Palmerton, property at 380 Lehigh Ave., $1.

Parryville

Bruce T. Koch at Bruce T. Koch, 1244 Cherry Hill Road, Palmerton, property at 1244 Cherry Hill Road, $1.

Township of Penn Forest

Joseph Gioia to Jason Jefremow, Netherlands, Lot 161 Hopi Road, $8,750.

Janice Lopopolo to Cameron Swink, 123 Shawnee Trail, Albrightsville, property at 123 Shawnee Trail, $174,900.

Northeast Investment Group Inc. to Carolyn Suess, Delanco, New Jersey, property on Old Stage Road, $20,000.

Arthur J. Diaz to Maria Diaz, Harrisburg, property on Woods Road, $30,000.

Jack Pezzano to Todd Evans, Kutztown, Towamensing Trails Lot V-1690, Section EV, $16,600.

Lorina J. Tumillo to Edward J. Hamilton, Ridley Park, Lot V1558, Section V, Towamensing Trails, $14,000.

Joseph. Renshaw to SVC Properties LLC, PO Box 197, Albrightsville, property at 12 Ransom Circle, Albrightsville, $100,000.

Thomas J. Cannalley Jr. to L & S Vacation Rentals LLC, Garnet Valley, property at 176 Sassafras Road, Albrightsville, $230,000.

Zina Kotlyar to DRB Real Estate LLC, Annville, Towamensing Trails Lot V-973, Section EV, $10,000.

Paul Donnelly to Nataj Alyx Chynelle Stirling, Sound Beach, New York, Towamensing Trails Lot V-1110, Section EV, $5,300.

William Christopher Lippert to Rachel Gurule, 66 Navajo Trail, Albrightsville, property at 66 Navajo Trail, $144,000.

Roy R. Wasch to Philip F. Sharp, 22 Hickory Run Lane, Jim Thorpe, property at 22 Hickory Run Lane, $160,000.

Carol A. Schley to Carol A. Schley, 72 Chesapeake Trail, Albrightsville, property at 72 Chesapeake Trail, $1.

John Dijohn to Allison L. Riley, 28 Recreation Drive, Jim Thorpe, property at 28 Recreation Drive, $255,000.

Everett Tompkins to Jason Corrente, Hammonton, New Jersey, estate at 63 Mountain Road, Albrightsville, $205,000.

Thomas R. Wrenn Jr. to Jolt Investment Group LLC, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., property at 81 Narragansett Trail, Albrightsville, $305,000.

Joseph Seemiller to Lorraine F. Justine, Newark, Delaware, Hickory Run Forest Lot 235, Section A, $3,500.

Vincent Miceli to Jeffrey C. Trewella, Kennett Square, property at 116 Petrarch Trail, Albrightsville, $188,000.

Stanley A. Fiedor Jr. to Joseph E. Laschenski III, Harleysville, estate at 1350 Bishop Circle, Albrightsville, $302,500.

Mary J. Carrano to Mary F. Kelley, Indian Rocks Beach, Fla., property at 205 Grouse Trail, Albrightsville, $120,000.

Jaime Garcia Jr. to Daniel McCormac, Akron, property at 292 McKuen Way, Albrightsville, $340,000.

Kevin P. Blaisse to Mark McClaine, Bristol, property at 728B Towamensing Trail, Albrightsville, $6,500.

Joseph A. Falco to Robert Moses Folk, Lincoln University, property at 297 Mountain View Drive, $233,000.

John C. Koehler at John C. Koehler, 92 Sunset Drive, Jim Thorpe, property at 92 Sunset Drive, $1.

Garry E. Palumbo to David Alexander Davis Booth, Philadelphia, property at 118 Coyote Drive, $100,000.

Richard J. Lipson to Bing He, Hockessin, Delaware, Lot V1039, Section V, Towamensing Trails, $23,000.

summit hill

Thomas J. Ferrence at 44 Mauch Chunk LLC, 101 Industrial Drive, Nesquehoning, property at 7-9 W. Ludlow St., $175,000.

Frances Seagrave to Frances Seagrave, Allamuchy, New Jersey, property at 43 W. Walter St., $1.

Cama Self Directed IRA to 2J2M LLC, Myerstown, property on Stoney Lonesome Road, $825,000.

Edward Kanick at Edward Kanick, 330 E. Holland St., Summit Hill, property on Laurel Drive, $1.

Township of Towamensing

Rocco Barile to Susan Selvaggio, 25 Halina Way, Kunkletown, property at 25 Halina Way, $520,000.

Justin Carlson to Jeffrey Hutchinson, 680 Carney Road, Palmerton, Henny Penny Farms Lot 17A, Section A, $77,500.

Troy M. Green at Troy M. Green, 1930 Forest Inn Road, Palmerton, property at 1930 Forest Inn Road, $1.

Troy M. Green to Rita M. Green, 270 Snyder Road, Palmerton, property at 270 Snyder Road, $1.

Weather report

Carbon County Sheriff to MEB REO Trust IV, Greenwood Village, Colorado, property at 195 Hudsondale St., $22,286.08.

Sarah C. Dagostin to Mary D. Gudoski, 277 Hudsondale St., Weatherly, property at 277 Hudsondale St., $125,000.

Joseph A. Chyko to Christy Lynn Chyko, 909A North St., Weatherly, Quadriplex Unit 8B, $1.

]]>
8 of Albany’s Best Restaurants https://robins-island.org/8-of-albanys-best-restaurants/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:01:08 +0000 https://robins-island.org/8-of-albanys-best-restaurants/ The Great Southern has some of the best produce in the world, so it’s no surprise that their restaurants don’t take any chances. Whether you’re looking for classic fish and chips, pub fare, or a sexy nightlife destination, we’ve found 8 of Albany’s best restaurants for your next trip down south. Freedom Located in the […]]]>

The Great Southern has some of the best produce in the world, so it’s no surprise that their restaurants don’t take any chances. Whether you’re looking for classic fish and chips, pub fare, or a sexy nightlife destination, we’ve found 8 of Albany’s best restaurants for your next trip down south.

Freedom

Located in the corner bar of the heritage-listed London Hotel, Liberté is very, very cool – offering an excellent selection of wines and craft beers, paired with a tantalizing mix of French and Vietnamese bar food. You’ll need it once you’ve sampled a few selections from their delicious cocktail offerings.

160-162 Stirling Terrace, Albany


Garrison Restaurant

Another Albany heavy hitter is Garrison, with an incredibly varied (and tasty) menu that features delights such as Jerusalem artichokes served with truffle butter, honey and feta, or cold-smoked Kinjarling Akoya oysters with native lime. There’s a food for every mood, and you’ll be ready to indulge after all the exploring you’ve done.

The best restaurants in Albany, Garrison

7 Forts Road, Mount Clarence


Ocean & Paddock

There are plenty of great fish and chip options around town, but it’s hard to top the multi-award winning Ocean & Paddock, voted Best in WA by the WA Fisheries Industry Council Awards for three years in a row! Their seasonal menu features many traditional fish and chip dishes, as well as more inventive uses of local seafood – think seafood tom yum, seared local bluefin tuna with a warm udon salad or even a boil seafood from Louisiana.

The best restaurants in Albany, ocean and paddock

116 Middleton Road, Middleton Beach


Directly south

If you’re looking for big, honest meals, head south, where you’ll find huge portions and spectacular views of the Princess Royal Harbour. They do mean steak, but we reckon their rotating specialties are really where they’re at – especially if you can get your hands on their spicy Korean-style brown chili.

Albany's Best Restaurants, Facing South

6 Toll Place, Albany


Earl of Spencer

If you like your pub food and pints steeped in history, Spencer’s Earl is a must visit. The owners have worked hard over the past couple of years to really clean up the place – no small feat considering it’s one of Australia’s oldest pubs. If you have little ones in tow they also have a nice enclosed outdoor play area.

60 Earl Street, Albany



Majuba Bistro

Sensual and inviting, Majuba Bistro is the perfect place for a cozy dinner in Albany. This tiered bistro mixes classic French and Spanish bites – though you’ll taste hints from across the continent. Spanish-style duck rillettes, pork belly in a sage crust, mussels with fries… It’s a little piece of Europe in our Deep South.

Albany's Best Restaurants, Majuba Bistro

132 York Street, Albany


Monty’s Jump

One of the best wine producers in the Deep South, Monty’s Leap has an equally good restaurant. Showcasing the region’s finest produce, you can expect crisp, fresh seafood accompanied by Bred Co bread, Green Range lamb and more.

Albany's Best Restaurants, Monty's Leap

45821 South Coast Highway, Kalgan


Wilson Brewery

If it’s craft beer you’re looking for, be sure to visit Matty and Jessica Wilson of the Wilson Brewing Company, who have been brewing amber pride since 2016. They’ll be happy to chat with you throughout throughout the process while offering a tasting of all the latest novelties. beer they’ve experimented with, while the Wilson Food Van will keep you well fed with burgers, wings, and more.

47768 South Coast Highway, Albany

Header Image: Garrison

]]>
Your Complete Guide to the Bridgerton Family https://robins-island.org/your-complete-guide-to-the-bridgerton-family/ Sat, 09 Apr 2022 15:00:19 +0000 https://robins-island.org/your-complete-guide-to-the-bridgerton-family/ Shows don’t get much more binge-worthy than Netflix’s Regency-era drama Bridgerton, which has just returned for its second season. The show has already been renewed for seasons three and four, and will also turn into a prequel series about Queen Charlotte. And as fans of Julia Quinn’s bestselling novel series know, each new season of […]]]>

Shows don’t get much more binge-worthy than Netflix’s Regency-era drama Bridgerton, which has just returned for its second season. The show has already been renewed for seasons three and four, and will also turn into a prequel series about Queen Charlotte. And as fans of Julia Quinn’s bestselling novel series know, each new season of the show will be a reimagining.

This is because, just like the books, each season of Bridgerton loosely focuses on another member of the Bridgerton family. So for fans who haven’t dabbled in the novels yet – or want to avoid spoilers and save themselves for the screen adaptation – here’s a complete guide to all eight siblings, in descending order of age. .

Advertising – Continue Reading Below

Bridgerton’s older brother played a key role in Season 1, which saw him take on the role of Viscount from his late father. As a firstborn, Anthony is burdened with enormous family responsibility and dutifully does his best to live up to his father. In Season 1, he helps his younger sister Daphne find the perfect match, while struggling to hide his own secret romance with opera singer Siena Rosso (Sabrina Bartlett).

Anthony becomes the focal point of Season 2. Based on Quinn’s second novel, The viscount who loved me, the season follows Anthony’s quest to find a wife. He is not looking for love, but rather a pleasant viscountess who will give him children and take care of his house. When he meets Edwina (Charithra Chandran), he thinks he has found his partner, but his sister, Kate (Simone Ashley) has other ideas. So begins a classic tale of foes to lovers.

The second eldest, Bridgerton, has largely been a source of light relief on the show to date – of all the siblings, he is the one who longs the most for a life outside of his familiar, privileged bubble. But Season 2 ended with Benedict at a crossroads, having made the devastating discovery that his place in art school had been bought for him by Anthony.

With his artistic life now tainted, Benoît is set to become the focal point of the show’s next season. Season 3 will presumably be based on Quinn’s third book, An offer from a gentleman, which is a Cinderella-inspired story that sees Benedict pursuing his happiness forever. After meeting a mysterious young woman at a masked ball, he sets out to find her. (However, it should be noted that some fans believe season three will delve into Collin’s story, saving Benedict’s for later.)

But since many fans interpreted Benedict’s on-screen version as odd, it’s possible the show will take a different approach to his romance. “Benedict has such a nice openness and flow to him in general, and it’s really, really fun to play because it can go anywhere,” said actor Luke Thompson. Weekly entertainment. “There’s a lot of space for him to explore all kinds of things.”

Colin’s romantic life has already received a lot of attention on the show. During Season 1, he announced his intention to marry Marina Thompson, but once her pregnancy was revealed, the marriage was sabotaged. Meanwhile, Colin’s childhood friend Penelope Featherington has been in love with him for many years, but so far he doesn’t seem to be reciprocating.

As fans of the books know, however, that’s subject to change. The fourth novel, and therefore perhaps the fourth season (or third, see above), sees Colin begin to see Penelope in a new light.

“What I love about my story is that I can explore it through all the seasons with the same person,” actor Luke Newton said. Today. “We are waiting for them to finally see what is in front of them.”

Bridgerton’s eldest daughter was the protagonist of Season 1, which began with her debut in society before Queen Charlotte. Thanks to the monarch’s approval, Daphne became the most eligible spinster in town, but the process of finding a husband quickly bored her. After a chance meeting with Simon Basset – who she later realizes is the mysterious Duke of Hastings – Daphne enters into a mutually beneficial false courtship with him. But over time, their steamy connection is impossible to deny.

Despite the absence of Regé-Jean Page in season 2, Daphne remains a central element of the series. After marrying Simon and having a child with him, she is in a more stable position to mentor her siblings. “Daphne leads the way in knowing what love is, what it means and what marriage means, and she tries to pass that knowledge on to Anthony,” she said. Weekly entertainment.

Eloise is a strong-willed young woman who doesn’t really want to get married and prefers to focus on her studies and her professional life. But given the society she lives in, it’s a tough prospect – and once her older sister Daphne marries, she’s aware the pressure on her is doubled.

Eloise’s story is at the center of Quinn’s fifth book, To Sir Phillip, with love. At this point in the story, she is still celibate at age 28, making her celibate by Regency standards. But after her best friend, Penelope, finds love with Colin, she begins to feel less secure in her choice to remain single. In the book, she eventually finds love with widower Sir Phillip Crane, but since Season 2 introduced a different potential love interest, it’s unclear which direction the show will go.

After appearing only briefly in the very last episode of season 1, Bridgerton’s sixth child was set to play a bigger role in the second season. But unfortunately it didn’t work. Francesca was in the first three episodes of Season 2, after which actress Ruby Stokes had to leave due to scheduling conflicts.

“After exhausting all other options, she unfortunately had to come out for reasons beyond our control,” said showrunner Chris Van Dusen. TVLine. “Maybe season three will be the charm.”

Francesca’s defining moment will likely come in season six, if the books are any indication. The sixth book when he was meanfollows a love triangle between Francesca, Michael Stirling and Michael’s cousin, the Earl of Kilmartin.

7

Hyacinth and Gregory Bridgerton

Bridgerton’s two younger siblings have, unsurprisingly, been kept on the sidelines of the drama so far.

The youngest daughter Hyacinth is the focus of book 7, It’s in his kiss, which sees her fall in love with Lady Danbury’s handsome grandson, Gareth St Clair, after he asks her for help translating an old family diary written in Italian. Thanks to a nasty family battle over his inheritance, Gareth is on the verge of becoming penniless, and the diary – and by extension Hyacinth – is his only hope.

Gregory, the youngest of all the Bridgertons, finds love in turn in the eighth and final book, On the way to the wedding. The story picks up as poor Gregory falls head over heels in love with not one, but of them unavailable women – first Hermione Watson, then her best friend Lucy, who volunteers to help her win Hermione’s heart.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and uploaded to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content on piano.io

Advertising – Continue Reading Below

]]>
Dionne Warwick is ending her residency in Las Vegas after six shows https://robins-island.org/dionne-warwick-is-ending-her-residency-in-las-vegas-after-six-shows/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 01:32:00 +0000 https://robins-island.org/dionne-warwick-is-ending-her-residency-in-las-vegas-after-six-shows/ Dionne Warwick the residency at the Stirling Club in Turnberry Place was due to run until December. It closed after two weeks and six performances. The entertainment legend made the call herself. Warwick informed Stirling Club officials that she was canceling all of her shows at the newly refurbished Stirling Hall. “Due to unforeseen circumstances, […]]]>

Dionne Warwick the residency at the Stirling Club in Turnberry Place was due to run until December. It closed after two weeks and six performances.

The entertainment legend made the call herself. Warwick informed Stirling Club officials that she was canceling all of her shows at the newly refurbished Stirling Hall.

“Due to unforeseen circumstances, the producers of ‘An Intimate Evening’ with Miss Dionne Warwick, have canceled all performances with immediate effect with no update on her upcoming public performance at the Stirling Club.”

Efforts to reach Warwick on Thursday were unsuccessful.

Warwick had mentioned on her opening night show that she fell and injured her shin, and was taken from the stage in a wheelchair. Warwick also told UNLV officials on Monday that she would not be able to attend the UNLV College of Fine Arts Hall of Fame induction dinner on Tuesday, where she was honored with another legend. . Paul Anca.

club manager Debbie Kelleher said on Thursday afternoon that she was “very open” to artists headlining the Stirling Room. The venue had been refurbished and extended for the Warwick shows. “We built it and know we know we can do it,” Kelleher said.

Those interested in following Warwick’s brief run can contact Kelleher at dk@thestirlingclublv.com.

For more information on ticket sales and refunds, please contact the “Disruptor Of All” box office at Tickets@disruptioninsales.com or disruptioninsales.com, or call 1-702-343-3436

John Katsilometes’ column airs daily in Section A. His “PodKats!” podcast can be found at reviewjournal.com/podcasts. Contact him at jkatsilometes@reviewjournal.com. To follow @johnnykats on Twitter, @JohnnyKats1 on Instagram.

]]>
Can anyone decipher this explanation for the rising permanent charge of electricity? https://robins-island.org/can-anyone-decipher-this-explanation-for-the-rising-permanent-charge-of-electricity/ Mon, 04 Apr 2022 17:40:18 +0000 https://robins-island.org/can-anyone-decipher-this-explanation-for-the-rising-permanent-charge-of-electricity/ Following Brian Lawson’s lengthy March 31 letter about the ongoing charges, allow me to share the response I received from my electric provider when I filed a complaint about how they substantiated their price increase. I requested a plain language explanation as to why the unit price and ongoing charges were increasing. Here is the […]]]>

Following Brian Lawson’s lengthy March 31 letter about the ongoing charges, allow me to share the response I received from my electric provider when I filed a complaint about how they substantiated their price increase. I requested a plain language explanation as to why the unit price and ongoing charges were increasing. Here is the explanation and I let the readers understand what this drivel means! I would ask Ofgem for their explanation.

“Renewable energy costs are heavily impacted by rising gas prices due to the importance of gas-fired power plants as a marginal unit to meet demand and it is the most important driver of the increase in wholesale electricity prices Renewable electricity prices are also influenced by the cost of carbon allowances, these allowances also increased significantly in 2021 and 2022.

READ MORE: Can we repeat the success of the 1990s campaign against poll tax?

“Carbon prices are additional to the cost of electricity prices because it is a marginal cost for non-renewable generation that must purchase carbon allowances to offset its carbon emissions. In addition, certain factors more localized in 2021 impacted our renewable energy sources i.e. low wind Many renewable costs are covered by the green levy and sometimes more expensive than the wholesale price why when [sic] the regulator increases the price ceiling, it does so for all fuels. The standard charge covers the pipelines made by the regulator in each area and is also used to cover the costs of energy lost by suppliers who have entered the administration.

Andy Lippok
by email

IN 1847, at a meeting on the abuses of landowners in North East Scotland who exported grain for high profits and fixed prices on local sales while the local people were starving, a speaker declared: “We have trampled on the people, we the people pillaged and endured, we people tyrannized and insulted, we have gathered and formed into phalanxes, we have shown to the aristocrats appalled and frightened the moral power and the physical force of our democracy (Julian Harney, Chartist, Aberdeen, January 1847).

READ MORE: Rishi Sunak ranked THIRD least popular Cabinet member in survey of Conservative members

We are now seeing energy of all kinds being plundered in Scotland by modern corporate aristocrats, for big profits and little or no benefit to Scotland, while Scotland’s poor are once again cold and hungry simply for fill their already burgeoning coffers in the City of London.

Where is the public outrage and action that saw this deliberate attack on the poorest people halted in 1847, so that local people could be fed in the Western Isles and North East Scotland, Scotland of today?

What has really changed in over 150 years with regard to relations between London and Scotland?

Where have the moral might and the physical strength of our (Scottish) democracy gone?

Peter Thomson
Kirkcudbright

I ENJOYED, as always, Hamish MacPherson’s story of Clan Bruce of the Lowlands (March 29), and would like to add a little more to this to bring it to a more recent date.

My neighbor in Sheriffmuir for many years was Bernard Bruce, who lived in Cauldhame, and was the seventh son of the ninth Earl of Elgin, born posthumously on July 12, 1917. His widowed mother later married Jack Stirling of Kippendavie, in who he will succeed as Laird of Cauldhame, who would be his home for the rest of his days.

The Honorable Bernard Bruce would join the Scots Guards at the start of World War II and eventually serve with the Long Range Desert Group behind enemy lines in the North African countryside, where for the better part of three years they would cause a spread widespread. chaos and disaster

for Rommel and the German occupying forces.

Bernard was in charge of the G2 patrol (guards) and would be rewarded by the MC for his work behind enemy lines. I feel like he and his record are largely forgotten now, as those events of the past fade into the distance of time. Perhaps this small contribution will keep his memory alive.

George M Mitchell
dunblane

]]>